chebby

Driver of 116 year old car dies in M23 accident.

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Someone has died in their classic car. Whether it was driver error, car fault or anything else is unknown. 

I think to speculate and discuss in here is poor form. His family might read this.

RIP.

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I don’t see any problem discussing the original post. Though I do suspect the OP is anti-motorist. Time will tell.

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Definitely worth revisiting the laws on that one. Wouldn't be too difficult to introduce a basic road worthiness certificate for classic/veteran cars that covers obvious safety points - we already have a network of places up and running that do that for cars over 4 years old.
That should also include a motorway compliance check, e.g. If it can't average 50mph then it's not allowed on motorways, again already enforceable for things like learners, hosses etc etc.

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I’m interested to know how you would enforce “If it can't average 50mph“.:?

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I don’t see any problem discussing the original post. Though I do suspect the OP is anti-motorist. Time will tell.

Not at all anti-motorist. Just not a fan of nostalgia taking precedence over safety.

Edited by chebby

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Even in my 2017 car I'm lucky to average 50mph on a journey, especially on the M25. 

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The Police once stopped a ‘classic’ car that was doing about 20mph on the inside lane of a motorway in the wet. The driver explained they were on their way to a car show and were worried about getting too much dirt in the wheel arches!

The Police inspected the car and found a number of other problems and decided to have a recovery truck take it to be thoroughly inspected by a mechanic.

The major fault (and the real reason for the low speed) turned out to be hand tightened nuts securing the top of the suspension/shock assemblies to the bodyshell. They had not torqued them properly tight - to handbook recommended values - because it might cause cracking of a new paint job in the vicinity of the nuts and they were due to judged at a concourse d’elegance event ...

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If memory serves me right the minimum speed on a motorway is 40 mph unless you have a mechanical problem, that's why mopeds aren't allowed on motorways.

As the regarding the classic car that was towed away because it was unsafe is due to owner neglect. These vintage cars, although nowhere as safe as modern cars, do get a certificate of roadworthy to allow these cars access to use public roads.

But there is always going to be an element of risk.

As I mentioned in the previous post, I would like to know how a lorry ploughed into the car when the driver has a lofty position and the vintage car is so missable, especially on a 3 carrigeway road.

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Even in my 2017 car I'm lucky to average 50mph on a journey, especially on the M25. 

Tell me about it. the average speed on the M25 is about same as a vintage car.

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Even in my 2017 car I'm lucky to average 50mph on a journey, especially on the M25. 

We average about 30 mph on the Isle of Mull on single track roads. When we visited Manchester recently, we clicked an average of 15...

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We average about 30 mph on the Isle of Mull on single track roads. When we visited Manchester recently, we clicked an average of 15...

In all truth, the only hold up you get on Mull is by sheep. The M25, by contrast, is a huge car park.

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In all truth, the only hold up you get on Mull is by sheep. The M25, by contrast, is a huge car park.

Exactly.

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I don't know from what position of authority the OP is coming from but as a classic car owner of some 35yrs I consider myself to be sufficiently knowledgeable to comment with some authority.

Even as an owner of several classic vehicles I am at a loss to understand how the FBHVC managed to 'hoodwink' the Govt. into allowing vehicles to get away with not needing to have an MOT. Yes there are a lot of reputable owners of classic vehicles out there but also doubtless the current system does allow poorly maintained vehicles to be out on the road. Personally I would fully support re-introducing an MOT.

The insurance industry could sort this out by incentivising classic car owners by penalising those who don't have an MOT.

The brakes and lighting on most classic vehicles are entirely suited to the speed that vehicle is capable of.

The issue of seat belts in classic vehicles can be challenging. It is possible to retro-fit static belts to many vehicles.

Regards

Richard

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In all truth, the only hold up you get on Mull is by sheep. The M25, by contrast, is a huge car park.

That sounds fantastic just ewe and the open road. 

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I completely agree about the MOT point, although it's worth noting that most modern MOT testing stations are not equipped to deal with (very) early vehicles. Something with transmission brakes, a transmission-driven servo or similar needs to be brake tested on the move with a Tapley meter or equivalent. Try asking your local Quickfit if they've got one.

It seems likely to me that the majority of the 'problem' lies with cars that are now considered classics, but simply because they are old and have somehow survived. The relatively low values and lack of an MOT requirement is a concern. I may be wrong, but I see no problem with the removal of the statutory MOT test for vehicles of such an age that it is not really appropriate, especially as a lot of the tested items might not even be present. Further, the value of such vehicle makes it extremely likely they will be maintained to a suitable standard.

The 40 year rule is what looks to me to be wrong. That means that currently any car first registered before 1979 doesn't need an MOT. A quick glance through the relevant adverts suggests that could include a lot of heaps.

As for the incident in question, we are unaware of the facts and in view of the circumstances it seems wrong to comment. Something or someone went wrong.

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