Recommended Posts

.... do they make such a difference to SOUND quality?

So many third party options available these days, all making incredible claims about making the LP12 better and more musical. Taking the LP12 to another level.  I have listened to a few alternatives in the past (some very expensive) and I just done hear it.

Any views.?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I have to agree with you. 

I am fortunate in that I have a good dealer who specialises in the LP12.  From time to time, he has had people tout their wares with a view to him being a route to market. He keeps an open mind on them until he has had time for some very critical listening.  I have been fortunate in being invited for my opinion and have had many opportunities to listen to purported 3rd party "upgrades". 

In my book, the purpose of an upgrade is to make something sound better.  The problem with many non-Linn parts is that they don't make the LP12 sound better, they make it sound different.  Accentuating the top end at the expense of bass is lauded as "increases fine detail".  Similarly focussing on the bass is hyped as "improves rhythm and timing".  Unfortunately human nature is such that very few people would go public on a forum or as an E-Bay seller with "I spent hundreds of pounds on product x, and I'm no longer enjoying the music the way I did."  Or in extremis,  "it made my deck sound worse, so I'm selling it." 

I can see the temptation for going with a 3rd party plinth in exotic wood with a fascinating grain pattern.  Something Linn don't do, as they have to sell in volume, whereas a specialist woodworker can focus on an individual requirement.  Again, whether substitution passes the "tune dem test" is a moot point.  

So, after all this rambling, when "taking it to another level", I think I would just follow the LP12 hierarchy of Majik sounding good (and surprisingly so, when the deck has been properly set up), Akurate sounding better, and Klimax sounding best.  There's three levels for you :).

Edited by Ian H
Corrected typo
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with that Ian. Unless you can do a fair dem between products (which is very difficult for most people) it is safer to stick with Linn for your upgrades. That is certainly what I have done.

Interestingly, the one item I could succumb for would be a special plinth, although I do love my Linn Oak.

Stu

8081381B-575F-496A-8CC0-2B2C5D6692E1.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer

If you consider how a record player works, in recovering a music signal from a wiggling groove in a piece of vinyl, the box that holds the mechanism isn’t likely to make a significant difference.  

If the standard Sondek plinth was made of, say, thin balsa wood, then a standard wooden plinth would possibly be less susceptible to vibration.  But as between different hardwoods it stretches credibility somewhat.  Not that extreme claims on materials or settings has even been absent from such discussions, so why not include plinths?

I am sure that the better constructed plinths quite possibly enable assembly and adjustments to be optimised.  But for me, it’s simply about the appearance one likes. I still have a soft spot for fluted Afromosia, but then my first Linn was like that!  (Aged picture below)C343D2BF-1820-48E2-A913-3DD73EC512F4.thumb.jpeg.c3a6938fdc41f8f486a357998f7f502a.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with that too Nopiano. I believe that plinths will make very little difference to SQ. It’s more about aesthetics. If people can really hear a difference, let alone an Improvement, the power to them!

Stu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently had a conversation with a Linn dealer about plinths. He said that since my plinth is about a 1990 vintage, a new plinth would most likely make a sonic improvement, as Linn have made some changes for the better with the design since then.

I ended up ordering a Woodsong plinth. He acknowledged that there is no sonic difference between a Woodsong and a Linn plinth. The differences are merely visual, and cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Moomintroll said:

I’m intrigued as to what changes your dealer is referring to, I can only think of the corner fillets that did improve things. The small, internal, corner brackets were only added to meet an export market requirement, IIRC, and don’t improve the sound (IMHO)

’troll

He didn't say, but I can ask next time I talk to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Stuart 1872 said:

Any views.?

My point of view: The Radikal is available with two housing options (Akurate and Klimax level). As their electronics are the same, any sound difference between both is either caused by better electrical shielding of the Klimax level enclosure or its less susceptibility to mechanic vibrations. If the latter is true, it wouldn’t be too surprising at all that different plinths do have an effect on SQ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dealer brought up a very good point. In his opinion, a major difference can be heard if your old plinth has swelled or had some other age related issue....loose seams etc., However, he feels that if your old plinth still has solid joints and is able to hold the top plate firmly and is still aligned well, then the possibility of a major increase in SQ is small.

Aesthetics are a different matter.

Edited by Daveyf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tested different tables for the LP12 and there was a significant difference. (To my surprise the effect was even more noticeable for the DSM).

And if the table can make a difference Isn’t it likely the plinth can do as well?

BY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

akamatsu: Which Woodsong plinth did your order and did you get it fluted?

From an aesthetic point of view I can easily vouch for the beauty of my Woodsong plinth (Madagascar Ebony). It was well worth the wait to get it for my new LP12 that was delivered in June of this year. 

From a build quality it is cream of the crop. Really you will not get any better. My dealer commented on how everything was so precisely perfect that all the Linn parts went together better than Linn's own plinths making setup one of the easier builds he has performed. 

From a sound quality point of view I can say I am very happy with the entire rig. Akurate Radikal | Akito 3B | Krystal | Kore | Trampolin 2 . I tend to feel the build quality of the plinth, along with the density of the wood and the Kore sub-chassis gives this LP12 a very solid framework to build upon. The entire audio spectrum is represented very well and the vibe of sonics just feels right. Even one of my anti-turntable friends feel it sounds awesome.

Downsides? The project grew over the course of a year and feature creep resulted in it going beyond the initial budget but I figured just be glad you can afford it and be happy. Does one need to invest in a custom plinth? Not at all. I just chose it for my project because it spoke to me and because it would be easier to just spec it this way for a new build than having to do a tear down sometime in the future.

Post pics when yours is finished or arrives. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bottom line with the plinths is that whilst they may have slightly differing sonic characteristics...the fitting of the top plate is by far the most important  factor when a plinth is changed .

I've  always believed that when folks report  hearing  significant differences with a plinth  swap or "upgrade" , they're mostly hearing differences in the fitting and overall set up.

[ Some old plinths of course are badly warped or have failing joints....so changing them will yield performance  benefits ]

 I would  add that I've no issue with  folks wanting to fit a beautiful custom plinth or changing a plinth to better  suite their décor ...something I have done myself .

Edited by Smokestack
  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎03‎/‎09‎/‎2019 at 10:06, Ian H said:

...

So, after all this rambling, when "taking it to another level", I think I would just follow the LP12 hierarchy of Majik sounding good (and surprisingly so, when the deck has been properly set up), Akurate sounding better, and Klimax sounding best.  There's three levels for you :).

...and it's always worth reminding ourselves that a  well set up Majik will sound better than a Klimax that isn't carefully and correctly set up ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer
On 04/09/2019 at 08:40, Baba Yaga said:

I tested different tables for the LP12 and there was a significant difference. (To my surprise the effect was even more noticeable for the DSM).

And if the table can make a difference Isn’t it likely the plinth can do as well?

BY

I’m sure the support, for the whole turntable, will be far more influential than the plinth alone.  Indeed, many support tables look like superb conductors of vibrations, which they collect via their fashionable pointed feet!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.