newlash09

Any idea for fitting wheels to speakers

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Some wheels (castors) have a lock feature I suppose that would work as well. I have to admit that this spike business can sometimes be overrated, and it all depends on your flooring surface and room as well. There's no guarantee to say spikes under speakers is going to give you the best effect every time. I have speakers I use with spikes and plenty I don't, just play with it in you room it might not yield the best results having them on spikes anyway.

If you are going to the effort of making big speakers you could even incorporate to make a mechanism underneath that could jack up or insert a wheel set just for moving as has been mentioned here already.

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On 29/08/2019 at 06:56, vintageaxeman said:

ce5640e1937d301a7d6236f2abf819e3.jpgMy speakers are likewise around 100kg each. 

I designed stainless steel outrigger style arms 10mm thick which are bolted to the bases of my cabinets-

i made M10 threaded holes in the ends, and fitted large casters which have an M10 threaded column at the top. This enabled me to move them around while I was building, and later, positioning them.

i also designed large spikes with M10 threads, locking collars etc, so that when the speakers were finished and in position, they could be tilted back and have the casters replaced with the spikes. It all worked very well.

You can see details of my build on Pinterest.

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/TheTrike/pride-joy-my-diy-atc-loudspeaker-project-pa65-atc-/

These are incredible speakers by the way, we need to see them at a Kegworth show please. Your coverage documentary shots of the build are excellent. Don't say it's impossible to get them to a show, the effort that's gone into these they need to be shared, plus there's about a hundred willing men when you arrive to help, that side anyway. And there has been much bigger travel much further for a Wam show. 

And while we are at it the same for your new builds Newsflash. They sound like they are going to be awesome. 

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Having owned shahinian obelisks on castors I’ve pondered this very question with heavier speakers. I recently owned a pair of 80kg Wilson w/p6 and I can confirm they didn’t slide particularly easily on carpet unless you pulled them from a low position. Not ideal. 

B&w d range have flip out wheels that retract for spikes! Fancy but not available to buy without the speaker. 

Having just  moved a 350kg table saw into my workshop I’d suggest getting some inspiration from heavy machinery bases available from loads of retailers. Often they combine wheels with a screw down feet. This could be done as an integral part of your design and would make a very interesting mini project

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On 01/09/2019 at 08:25, eddie-baby said:

These are incredible speakers by the way, we need to see them at a Kegworth show please. Your coverage documentary shots of the build are excellent. Don't say it's impossible to get them to a show, the effort that's gone into these they need to be shared, plus there's about a hundred willing men when you arrive to help, that side anyway. And there has been much bigger travel much further for a Wam show. 

And while we are at it the same for your new builds Newsflash. They sound like they are going to be awesome. 

Hi Eddie-baby :)

Thanks for your kind words. Even I  can't wait to see and hear the end product. 

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23 hours ago, Knipester said:

Having owned shahinian obelisks on castors I’ve pondered this very question with heavier speakers. I recently owned a pair of 80kg Wilson w/p6 and I can confirm they didn’t slide particularly easily on carpet unless you pulled them from a low position. Not ideal. 

B&w d range have flip out wheels that retract for spikes! Fancy but not available to buy without the speaker. 

Having just  moved a 350kg table saw into my workshop I’d suggest getting some inspiration from heavy machinery bases available from loads of retailers. Often they combine wheels with a screw down feet. This could be done as an integral part of your design and would make a very interesting mini project

Thanks a lot Knipester :)

Retractable spikes with fixed wheels, which when completed screwed in, can lift the speaker up to disengage the wheels, looks like a doable thing. 

I shared @vintageaxeman's idea with my friend. But he is unable to find someone to do the machining part of the base. So he doesn't look very keen on it at the moment. But I did love the idea myself. So I will get the bases fabricated in a work shop in my place, once Iam down from my sail. And your idea of continuously retractable spikes and wheels to keep changing the speakers position, sounds good to me. Will give it a go by this month end.  Thanks again :)

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I have some big speakers on the mental back burner, (ehem, 9 drivers each, ehem) they will be heavy. My idea so far is to design them with, in effect, a built in sack barrow, i.e. wheels that touch the floor when tilted backwards, and some sort of handle at the top back, and also runners along the back so they can slide along carpeted surfaces.... I am thinking i should make the top mid / tweeter section removable as that will not be so heavy and is more fragile. I have all the drivers, and even lifting two woofers at the same time is "enough".

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7 hours ago, dave said:

I have some big speakers on the mental back burner, (ehem, 9 drivers each, ehem) they will be heavy. My idea so far is to design them with, in effect, a built in sack barrow, i.e. wheels that touch the floor when tilted backwards, and some sort of handle at the top back, and also runners along the back so they can slide along carpeted surfaces.... I am thinking i should make the top mid / tweeter section removable as that will not be so heavy and is more fragile. I have all the drivers, and even lifting two woofers at the same time is "enough".

Wow...that's a good idea indeed Dave :)

Thanks for sharing. I could even remove the wheels once I've found the right position for the speakers. And seems the easiest fix too. Will have a chat with my friend about this. Thanks again.

By the way 9 drivers per speaker each. I bet it's gonna weigh a ton. What are the physical dimensions of the cabinet you are looking at. You've certainly piqued my interest here :D

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About 4 x 1 x 1 1/2 ft so the mid tweets are at about ear height on a comfortable chair

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You can buy teflon sliders for furniture which would work. I had some for my old massive CRT TV. It made moving on carpet incredibly easy.

Available very cheaply on amazon

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Super Wammer

A couple of random reflections based on some excellent contributions...

Couple or isolate?

  • The theory behind spikes is to connect through a carpet to give the cabinet something solid to couple to; castors won't do this.
  • This of course means that spikes would be completely wrong for many applications eg. if you have wooden cavity flooring beneath your carpet.
  • You need to decide whether you wish/need to couple or decouple
  • I suspect if your speakers weigh 100kg each then they're not made of balsa wood so resonances might be less of an issue... but you need to be clear on whether you intend/need to couple or decouple....
  • ... and this will determine your preferred feet option.

Move frequency

  • I may have missed this in my speed-reading but your end design may depend on whether you face only the massive initial challenge of getting them into your home and then the modest challenge of refining their "basically forever" position, or whether you need to be able to move them more frequently
  • If it's mainly about the initial install and refinement then I'd be focusing on something effective but temporary
  • I wouldn't personally want my speakers living on wheels...
  • Mind you, I've just had a business idea for some audiophile wheels with sorbothane tyres and Townshend-style suspension ;)

Height

  • A major driver of speaker design is to ensure that the higher frequency driver(s), which are more directional than lower frequency drivers, are at ear height in a typical listening position. Hence sloping baffles and similar artefacts.
  • If you were going to stick something on the bottom of your speakers which increased the height by 10cm (4 inches) then you'd want to be sure that the design took account of this additional height.
  • If you're going to the hassle, expense and excitement of commissioning speakers then you'd be gutted if you ignored the height and found you needed to sit on an audiophile grade 4 inch cushion to get to the optimum listening position!

Ignore if not helpful!

Nigel

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Super Wammer
On 09/10/2019 at 17:50, TheFlash said:

A couple of random reflections based on some excellent contributions...

Couple or isolate?

  • The theory behind spikes is to connect through a carpet to give the cabinet something solid to couple to; castors won't do this.
  • This of course means that spikes would be completely wrong for many applications eg. if you have wooden cavity flooring beneath your carpet.
  • You need to decide whether you wish/need to couple or decouple
  • I suspect if your speakers weigh 100kg each then they're not made of balsa wood so resonances might be less of an issue... but you need to be clear on whether you intend/need to couple or decouple....
  • ... and this will determine your preferred feet option.

Move frequency

  • I may have missed this in my speed-reading but your end design may depend on whether you face only the massive initial challenge of getting them into your home and then the modest challenge of refining their "basically forever" position, or whether you need to be able to move them more frequently
  • If it's mainly about the initial install and refinement then I'd be focusing on something effective but temporary
  • I wouldn't personally want my speakers living on wheels...
  • Mind you, I've just had a business idea for some audiophile wheels with sorbothane tyres and Townshend-style suspension ;)

Height

  • A major driver of speaker design is to ensure that the higher frequency driver(s), which are more directional than lower frequency drivers, are at ear height in a typical listening position. Hence sloping baffles and similar artefacts.
  • If you were going to stick something on the bottom of your speakers which increased the height by 10cm (4 inches) then you'd want to be sure that the design took account of this additional height.
  • If you're going to the hassle, expense and excitement of commissioning speakers then you'd be gutted if you ignored the height and found you needed to sit on an audiophile grade 4 inch cushion to get to the optimum listening position!

Ignore if not helpful!

Nigel

Just to add to the above, much of which I agree with totally, I found that when I followed ATC's manual guidance on height and angle, my SCM150ASLTs 'opened up' considerably. The manual says:

"All ATC 3-way loudspeakers are designed with the mid-range dome as the reference acoustic axis. With this in mind, the loudspeakers should be positioned with the mid-range dome at, or slightly below ear level"

SO....the acoustic axis of ALL 3-way ATC speakers is designed such that the MIDrange driver of the speakers should be positioned at between 0 and 5 degrees ABOVE ear level. (one of ATC's technicians gave me the 5 degree figure). To do this, my ATCs needed to be tipped back slightly. Note that the key is the MIDrange centre, NOT the tweeter centre as is often the case with many other speaker manufacturers.

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Super Wammer

IMF TLS 80s were always recommended to be tilted back around 5 deg 

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My Kef Ref Sub came with optional metal Castors, that replace the standard feet.

They look a bit like this:

Related image

Edited by CnoEvil
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Super Wammer
22 minutes ago, CnoEvil said:

My Kef Ref Sub came with optional metal Castors, that replace the standard feet.

They look a bit like this:

Related image

And smart they are too. They were of course selected/provided by the manufacturer who would, one would hope, comply with their own height recommendations (although for a sub I'm not sure how relevant this is). If those seeking "after market" suggestions limit the height of their ambitions (see what I did there?) to the height of the supplied spikes then no argument.

Edited by TheFlash

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