Ian

My word can't tht black stuff be good ?!

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I've enjoyed my TT (Project Classic) for a couple of years now but always wondered what the benefits of an improved cartridge might bring. With the fitted Ortofon silver spinning vinyl was a treat and rarely a disappointment but enter the Goldring 1042, fitted by a lovely chap at Nottingham Hi Fi. It's gorgeous and releases the potential of this fine spinner I feel. Pretty much improved in every dimension, and significantly. 

I appreciate records aren't loved by all, and it's as far from streaming as you can get, but a joyful thing to do if you fancy it. Anyway, got to go, I have to flip to side 2 !

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Ian,

You are deluded.

Look at the signal to noise ratio, the frequency response, the distortion levels you can't be enjoying stunning music. So stop it. Download a million charts and look at them and prove it.  :o

Or you could just listen and continue to enjoy the music. :D

You're right it is rather good.

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13 minutes ago, George 47 said:

Ian,

You are deluded.

Look at the signal to noise ratio, the frequency response, the distortion levels you can't be enjoying stunning music. So stop it. Download a million charts and look at them and prove it.  :o

Or you could just listen and continue to enjoy the music. :D

You're right it is rather good.

;-) I really haven't appreciated just how lovely this can be until just now. Older (early 60s) jazz pressings sound gorgeous. 

Note: This isn't a vinyl vs. other stuff post, just one saying how lovely it is because this is where you do that sort of thing ! 

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4 minutes ago, Ian said:

This isn't a vinyl vs. other stuff post,

Not yet :cafe:

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why should it  be anything v owtelse. Streamin, CD's, tape, and vinyl all with one very important thing in common, they all carry music. Sometimes, when you want to try new, or new to you music, streaming is the only sensible route, othertimes you want to immerse yourself into some old, well loved favourites. Then vinyl, and only vinyl is good enough. CD's fit somewhere inbetween in my case.

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It's a pain and it's an expensive pain. To get the equivalent (potential) quality costs significantly more for vinyl than for CD. You could buy an old CD player for £20 and it would be perfectly acceptable. Try that with vinyl.... And it also offers immense and frightening temptations to upgrade. Worse, upgrading DACs can not infrequently bring a world of misery, whereas in the majority of cases, a better cartridge or phono stage simply sounds better.

The real problem is that whilst vinyl technically should sound worse (and certainly can), a great many recordings are simply mastered better on vinyl. Studios deliberately compress and limit digital recordings to suit the (unfortunately) majority of systems/users, whereas ironically, the technically worse medium (vinyl) usually gets mastered properly. Not always the case, but seemingly more often than not.

I've had a vinyl system for too many decades to count. In fact, I think that all the time I've had any sort of hifi system, I've had a turntable. I enjoy the convenience of digital, but I could live without streaming and even a CD player without it bothering me excessively. I could not give up my vinyl so easily.

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Super Wammer
Posted (edited)

Playing LPs probably represents only about 10% of my music consumption nowadays, but I still marvel that it works at all.  To think, when I started out it was the vast majority, with radio maybe 20%, and it was just a given.  However, almost all my records are pre-CD era, and very many are pure analogue.  I do struggle a bit with the idea of spending twenty quid on a new LP mastered from a digital source - though I realise there are occasionally mastering differences.  

Once you’re immersed in an LP there’s little to better it!

Edited by Nopiano
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5 hours ago, George 47 said:

You are deluded.

:whistle:

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Nopiano said:

Playing LPs probably represents only about 10% of my music consumption nowadays, but I still marvel that it works at all.  To think, when I started out it was the vast majority, with radio maybe 20%, and it was just a given.  However, almost all my records are pre-CD era, and very many are pure analogue.  I do struggle a bit with the idea of spending twenty quid on a new LP mastered from a digital source - though I realise there are occasionally mastering differences.  

Once you’re immersed in an LP there’s little to better it!

Indeed. Couldn't agree more.

TBH, if anyone asked me about starting out on the vinyl path I would probably discourage them in some way. But as vinyl has been a constant format since the 1960s, spending £15.00 or so is well worth it the years of pleasure I get from the format.

And no, for anyone thinking I'm starting a CD v vinyl thingy is wrong. Vinyl IMO is no better than any other format but it does offer something different.

Edited by plasticpenguin
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The other major advantage of vinyl is as you get on in years, you can actually read the sleeve without resorting to having to find a magnifying glass (my pet hate of CDs .. now remedied with a +3 pair of reading glasses.  The only trouble is I forget I am wearing them, as I close my eyes usually when listening, then get up and think "what the f..k my eyes have gone blurry" until I remember I have got very strong reading glasses on.  

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44 minutes ago, uzzy said:

The other major advantage of vinyl is as you get on in years, you can actually read the sleeve without resorting to having to find a magnifying glass (my pet hate of CDs .. now remedied with a +3 pair of reading glasses.  The only trouble is I forget I am wearing them, as I close my eyes usually when listening, then get up and think "what the f..k my eyes have gone blurry" until I remember I have got very strong reading glasses on.  

Yup - I can associate with that. My old porkies are a bit iffy when it comes to small print, even though I wear glasses. I also like the feel of a record cover. It usually has notes or a booklet... sometimes even a poster. A vinyl record is an experience compared to cheap tatty plastic used for CD cases. They're just nasty.

As a side note: About 4-5 years ago when figures released about the sales figures for turntables had hit a high, there seemed to be a lot of hipsters buying tables to impress their friends; very few had actually purchased records.... how pointless was that? I've never purchased anything to impress anyone other than to satisfy my own ego.

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2 hours ago, Ian said:

I think I've rediscovered 60s Jazz, those old records sound stunning.

I've recently purchased Sinatra in the Sands with Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong. Both superb sounding.  

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Agree. 

Vinyl album sleeves also became an art form. It is not possible to have a decent copy of the Roger Dean covers from the Yes albums on the tiny CD covers. The Led Zeppelin Physical Graffiti cover not only lost them money but was a really great piece of album art.

Try putting your CD covers in a frame and hanging them on the wall.

CDs/digital also changed my way of listening to albums. With vinyl, I played the whole album, both sides and enjoyed the whole piece of music. With digital, I tend to play tracks and this samples the album. Not good for classical where it is tempting to listen to the 'lollipop' part of Beethoven's 9th for example rather than enjoy the whole piece.  Less satisfying. Maybe super convenience has a downside. 

A lot of the 60s and some 70s albums were made before the dreaded Digital Audio WorkStations came on the scene and the sound quality went out of the window.

Oh and the sound quality ends being quite good.

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1 hour ago, George 47 said:

Agree. 

Vinyl album sleeves also became an art form. It is not possible to have a decent copy of the Roger Dean covers from the Yes albums on the tiny CD covers. The Led Zeppelin Physical Graffiti cover not only lost them money but was a really great piece of album art.

Try putting your CD covers in a frame and hanging them on the wall.

CDs/digital also changed my way of listening to albums. With vinyl, I played the whole album, both sides and enjoyed the whole piece of music. With digital, I tend to play tracks and this samples the album. Not good for classical where it is tempting to listen to the 'lollipop' part of Beethoven's 9th for example rather than enjoy the whole piece.  Less satisfying. Maybe super convenience has a downside. 

A lot of the 60s and some 70s albums were made before the dreaded Digital Audio WorkStations came on the scene and the sound quality went out of the window.

Oh and the sound quality ends being quite good.

Very true - here is my current wall display (we change it every now and then) 

IMG_20190611_120356706.jpg

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