emale

A question of time.

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A question,

If you added a 3rd speaker to a system which was connected for example on a cable that was 10m longer than the other 2, would there be a delay on the 3rd speaker?

Kind regards

D

p.s. This is probably fairly easy but I’m err tipsy and couldn’t be bothered sifting through all that google crap. 

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The 3rd speaker's sound would reach you late by 0.029 secs to be precise. Cheers :D

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Super Wammer
Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, newlash09 said:

The 3rd speaker's sound would reach you late by 0.029 secs to be precise. Cheers :D

it's 29 nanoseconds, or 29x10-8 seconds.

Edited by smegger68
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Posted (edited)

The difference would be indistinguishable unless you would actually position the speaker 10m further. 

In fact if that speaker was closer to you, assuming 10m distance, than the other two, it would be them that would sound delayed. 

Edited by insider9
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17 hours ago, insider9 said:

The difference would be indistinguishable unless you would actually position the speaker 10m further. 

In fact if that speaker was closer to you, assuming 10m distance, than the other two, it would be them that would sound delayed. 

This is the correct answer.

The cable length is hardly relevant, your exakt position towards any of the speakers however is.

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22 hours ago, newlash09 said:

The 3rd speaker's sound would reach you late by 0.029 secs to be precise. Cheers :D

If the speaker iteself is this far away, then our young sailor friend has the right figure; the speed of sound is about 350 metres per second.

If the speaker is as close as the others, but the wire is 10 metres longer, it's very different. For all intents and purposes you can assume the speed of an electrical signal through a cable is close to 300,000 kilometres per second. You can do the maths, but safe to say the delay is inaudible.

A perfect example of why measurements can be important, but for them to be meaningful, you need to know exactly what is is that's being measured.

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On 08/06/2019 at 00:51, emale said:

A question,

If you added a 3rd speaker to a system which was connected for example on a cable that was 10m longer than the other 2, would there be a delay on the 3rd speaker?

Kind regards

D

Why would you want to add a 3rd loudspeaker, unless you wanted an AV centre speaker ?.. but as this is a two channel forum that cannot be the reason, can it?

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7 minutes ago, uzzy said:

Why would you want to add a 3rd loudspeaker, unless you wanted an AV centre speaker ?.. but as this is a two channel forum that cannot be the reason, can it?

A sub, for example

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Tony_J said:

A sub, for example

Ah yes .. good point.  Avoid extra wires and the headache of choosing them - get a speaker that does it without a sub :D and if your room is too small you owe it to yourself to move lol 

Edited by uzzy
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Super Wammer
15 hours ago, rabski said:

If the speaker iteself is this far away, then our young sailor friend has the right figure; the speed of sound is about 350 metres per second.

If the speaker is as close as the others, but the wire is 10 metres longer, it's very different. For all intents and purposes you can assume the speed of an electrical signal through a cable is close to 300,000 kilometres per second. You can do the maths, but safe to say the delay is inaudible.

A perfect example of why measurements can be important, but for them to be meaningful, you need to know exactly what is is that's being measured.

The speed of a signal through a powered sub is however not necessarily that good, especially if it incorporates DSP, which can add significant latency.

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