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16 bit / 44.1 khz - is it all we need ?

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Despite being convinced from experience that higher resolution formats have a slight audible advantage, in my opinion Redbook is adequate for distribution.

I agree with @meninblack that the quality of the recording is far more important to the final result, and we'd all need to own the highest fidelity systems and really quiet rooms to take full advantage of high-res anyway.

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3 hours ago, meninblack said:

All we really need is vinyl. :D

not the first time i have heard that !

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3 hours ago, meninblack said:

All we really need is vinyl. :D

But seriously sir...how do you think  vinyl vs modern Hires or DSD compare. I'd be very interested. Iam not a very scientific guy. So Iam not stuck up on sample rates or dynamic head room. From a listening point of view, does vinyl have that same sense of resolution and detail as modern Hires recordings. Thanks.

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From a listening point of view, vinyl has tone and body and warmth and musicality.   Resolution and detail can't get close to that.

If the music was dead, and I wanted to perform its autopsy, then hi-rez digital would be the way to go.  Probably with a Chord or Linn amp and some uber-detailed speakers.

But it isn't dead, and I want to enjoy it. So vinyl.

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4 minutes ago, meninblack said:

From a listening point of view, vinyl has tone and body and warmth and musicality.   Resolution and detail can't get close to that.

If the music was dead, and I wanted to perform its autopsy, then hi-rez digital would be the way to go.  Probably with a Chord or Linn amp and some uber-detailed speakers.

But it isn't dead, and I want to enjoy it. So vinyl.

Thanks for that sir . Just what I was looking for:)

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If you buy a vinyl front-end for the same sort of money as your transport/DAC, you will be absolutely stunned. :^

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16/44 is certainly all I need.

The limitations are elsewhere - mainly room acoustics, loudspeaker performance (this includes amp as part of the transducer system performance) and recording quality.

The rest is pretty much perfect these days or at least way better.

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10 minutes ago, meninblack said:

If you buy a vinyl front-end for the same sort of money as your transport/DAC, you will be absolutely stunned. :^

Thanks for the advise sir :)

Iam definitely on it now :)

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22 minutes ago, newlash09 said:

But seriously sir...how do you think  vinyl vs modern Hires or DSD compare. I'd be very interested. Iam not a very scientific guy. So Iam not stuck up on sample rates or dynamic head room. From a listening point of view, does vinyl have that same sense of resolution and detail as modern Hires recordings. Thanks.

Vinyl adds a lot more own sound than digital (by own sound I mean distortions of various kinds). Some of those distortions can sound very nice to some people because they are signal-correlated (like added reverb and warmth).

I guess that choosing one format over the other depends on many factors such as the type of music you listen to, etc.

I did try to enjoy vinyl but ultimately failed to listen past its shortcomings and realised that I couldn't live with it. But I listen mostly to classical music which is more demanding than the other genres in terms on technical performance and is quite well served in terms of mastering quality in CD or High-Res.

I wasn't particularly fond of the cost or the inconvenience either, but did love the large covers and booklets.

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7 minutes ago, tuga said:

Vinyl adds a lot more own sound than digital (by own sound I mean distortions of various kinds). Some of those distortions can sound very nice to some people because they are signal-correlated (like added reverb and warmth).

I guess that choosing one format over the other depends on many factors such as the type of music you listen to, etc.

I did try to enjoy vinyl but ultimately failed to listen past its shortcomings and realised that I couldn't live with it. But I listen mostly to classical music which is more demanding than the other genres in terms on technical performance and is quite well served in terms of mastering quality in CD or High-Res.

I wasn't particularly fond of the cost or the inconvenience either, but did love the large covers and booklets.

Thanks a lot for sharing Tuga...I've only heard a vinyl once in my friend's place. It was a heavily modified lenco with custom plinth and vibration control at the footers. Though the sound was  very different to what I was accustomed to being a digital guy. It was the pops that kept me off. And this was 3 years ago. But ever since, I've joined my local vinyl group. And I keep getting videos forwarded to me , recorded on cell phones with their TT's playing. And Iam now finding it So pristine and pure, that Iam completely convinced that I have to get a TT for myself. Let's see sir :)

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1 minute ago, newlash09 said:

Thanks a lot for sharing Tuga...I've only heard a vinyl once in my friend's place. It was a heavily modified lenco with custom plinth and vibration control at the footers. Though the sound was  very different to what I was accustomed to being a digital guy. It was the pops that kept me off. And this was 3 years ago. But ever since, I've joined my local vinyl group. And I keep getting videos forwarded to me , recorded on cell phones with their TT's playing. And Iam now finding it So pristine and pure, that Iam completely convinced that I have to get a TT for myself. Let's see sir :)

One thing is certain: you won't know until you've tried it!

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1 minute ago, tuga said:

One thing is certain: you won't know until you've tried it!

Fully agree sir :)

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I have to agree with @meninblack & @tuga, the quality of the recording is the most important thing. While I don’t have any 24/192 recordings I do have downloads that are 24/48, but if they are recorded by amateurs in your mum’s basement on equipment that costs less than an audiophile will spend on a cable then they will still sound crap. 

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7 hours ago, Blackmetalboon said:

I have to agree with @meninblack & @tuga, the quality of the recording is the most important thing. While I don’t have any 24/192 recordings I do have downloads that are 24/48, but if they are recorded by amateurs in your mum’s basement on equipment that costs less than an audiophile will spend on a cable then they will still sound crap. 

Indeed. Case in point - the original Santana album with the b&w cover - recorded in 1969, lousy recording, the cd sounds like you're hearing it through cotton wool. By the time they recorded Abraxas the recording quality was a great deal better - no cotton wool on the cd version. Same medium, same band, vastly different recording quality.

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Posted (edited)

We just don't know what's good enough really .

I think we still have a lot to learn about what digital artefacts our ears & brains are able to discern, and how they can  affect our listening experience .

The practical problem for domestic music playback today  is that technology doesn't stand still  long enough for any universally accepted quality standards to be established or for anybody to learn how to get the best from it.

And folks who have mentioned the relevance of  genre have a good point.

Those of us listening primarily to "popular music" in its various forms have routine access only to commercial download/ streaming files.... which are compressed  to hell and optimised for playback via low quality and portable playback devices.

If there were routinely higher resolution and/or  less compressed  "Hi Fi " files available for all commercial releases [ mastered and engineered to accepted and consistent standards]....some of us might  be a little happier than we are about digital playback in the home.

Edited by Smokestack
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