Bodgit

Dedicated HiFi circuit design

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9 hours ago, Turk 182 said:

hi again and thanks for the quick reply.

i think this cable is silver plated - once again mark is big on the use of silver...if the plating in done properly !

(i asked mark whether silver plated cables deteriorate and he advised only if the plating is done incorrectly)

one thing to note / i have been advised is that the silver plated contact do oxidise quickly so may be worth checking and cleaning if needed.

There's no point in silver cabling, just use thicker copper if you are obsessed with resistance.

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1 hour ago, Blackmetalboon said:

BS 7671 (The Electrical Regulations) recognises cables complying to 14 different BS numbers. If a cable does not have a BS number then it is a non standard cable and shouldn’t be used for fixed wiring.

hi blackmetalboon and thanks for this - will check it out.

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Posted (edited)

There is a good reason that copper has been the material of choice for household and industrial wiring for almost forever. It has extremely high conductivity, good physical properties and good resistance to corrosion. The only time it has not been used in decades was during shortages, when it was (unsatisfactorily) replaced by aluminium. Unsatisfactory, because aluminium has a higher electrical resistance, so in thinner wires generate more heat under load. Aluminium is used for the very high voltage overhead lines between pylons because it's a lot more cost effective, and at massively higher voltages, the resistive load is not a serious problem.

Silver is stupidly pointless in such cases. The minimal additional conductivity is meaningless over the lengths in question, and the reduced corrosion resistance is a serious problem in the long term.

FWIW, I'm not knocking it for the sake of it. I use silver-plated phono connections and some silver internal signal wiring. Why? Because I've got a reel of the stuff and a pile of the connectors and I think it looks pretty. Does it make a difference? Almost certainly not, but I don't care. Would I use it for mains installation wiring? Not in a million years.

Edited by rabski
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11 minutes ago, rabski said:

Aluminium is used for the very high voltage overhead lines between pylons because it's a lot more cost effective, and at massively higher voltages, the resistive load is not a serious problem

Interestingly, aluminium is used at lower voltages too. When the mains supply to our holiday cottages was laid in, the 240v feed cables from the ground mounted transformer to the cottages were all (armoured) aluminium. One of the cables had its insulation damaged on installation and a couple of years later, it failed. The aluminium at the point of failure had all converted to aluminium oxide (alumina) which is considerably bulkier than the original metal, so the cable had expanded and eventually split the insulation. Illustrates one of the less desirable aspects of ally - it is a highly reactive metal, and oxidises in a heartbeat. Attach it to other metals and the junction becomes the focus of interesting chemical reactions - if you ever owned a Landy Defender you would know all about this, the places where the ally body is attached to the steel frames rot to hell and there's nothing you can do about it. So while ally is a cheap solution for use in mains and high voltage wiring, it has its challenges!

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