horace

Grateful for advice on buying a hybrid pushbike...

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3 minutes ago, parcelmonkey said:

Funny how it suddenly creeps up on you the weight, for years it doesn't exist and then Bam! suddenly you notice it. Same here! :D

A quick search suggests for all round cheapness the Orbea Comfort might suffice, Shimano M315 disk brakes which stop okay, suspension seatpost will absorb enough discomfort, an adjustable headstock for a more upright riding position and although the Suntour fork is cheap and basic, it's still fitted on some of the more expensive hybrids you listed. The more upright cycling position will be more comfortable too!

Only downside is one left and it's a medium frame, which normally I advise okay if between 5 feet 6 and 5 feet 10 inches. What height & inside leg are you? If you don't mind telling?

https://www.cyclesolutions.co.uk/1727/products/orbea-comfort-10-2018-hybrid-bike--bluegreen.aspx

£419.99 and all you'd need are mudguards fitted for better protection against mud splashes up your backside to stop you looking like you had a bit of an accident en-route, if you get my drift!

I'm 5'7", so a medium frame will be fine for me.

I've just hit 50, and am realising that no further weight will come off without some effort!

That Orbea looks great value, but apparently bikes with sale reductions of over 12% can't be bought via cycle to work scheme. I did look for a bike with a belt drive, but the only one I could find on that site was the Marin Presidio 3, and that's out of stock.

the last bike I owned was a Raleigh racer. That was a very, very long time ago - I can remember being awestruck that it had twelve (yes, TWELVE) gears. Wow - impossible...

I was only about 12 myself...

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A bit of digging reveals that I can in fact look at bikes in a selection of local shops, so I'm not limited to the ones on the Cycle Solutions site.

A few that have caught my eye so far are the Marin Presidio 3, Cannondale Bad Boy (stupid name) and the Cube Hyde (the variant with belt drive). 

It seems that most manufacturers offer several variants of a given model, with the base one starting at (say) £500, and the more expensive ones offering extras such as hydraulic disk brakes etc.

Plenty of retailers in Newcastle, so I'll go and check a few out and see what feels comfortable.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, horace said:

A bit of digging reveals that I can in fact look at bikes in a selection of local shops, so I'm not limited to the ones on the Cycle Solutions site.

A few that have caught my eye so far are the Marin Presidio 3, Cannondale Bad Boy (stupid name) and the Cube Hyde (the variant with belt drive). 

It seems that most manufacturers offer several variants of a given model, with the base one starting at (say) £500, and the more expensive ones offering extras such as hydraulic disk brakes etc.

Plenty of retailers in Newcastle, so I'll go and check a few out and see what feels comfortable.

LONG POST AHEAD - Much to say...

Excellent news: the best bit of advice is go sit on some and see how they feel to you and your body frame. Dependent on your torso, the reach to the handlebars will either feel too much of a stretch or not.

Some further news, belt drives are quieter in operation and of course cleaner. However, they are not completely maintenance free, requiring perfect set up to run true and not slightly twisted, otherwise they can and do snap. The bottom brackets do wear out over time, especially if someone has over tensioned the belt. If you are dynamic with pedalling this can also cause some issues with belts snapping, however you'd have to be pushing hard. They are not that great in muddy or dusty conditions as this can cause issues with clogging.

The other downside is gear ratios, very little choice, so ensure the ratios are right for you and the terrain you'll be travelling on. The upside to hub gears, you can change gears at the lights without moving, derailleurs need you to be pedaling to change gears and I've seen people in the wrong chainset cog and rear cogs often, which causes chains to wear prematurely.

700C wheels are less compliant on the road, compared to 29'ers which roll better and absorb bumps better but are slightly slower to get up to speed. Bigger more cushioned tyres which means you don't require suspension forks.

Marin bikes have always had a name & prices to match, nice looking bikes, good frames, comfortable rides but normally cheaper components.

Cannondale, excellent rides, creaky frames always, ride one to see what I mean, the lefty fork can be off-putting to some as it's a single fork to the left side, can be expensive in parts. Unless you're spending more money, at your lower price points, chain derailleurs (messy) and cable operated hydraulic brakes, not as good as hydraulic and will need adjusting more regularly. You either love 'em or hate them. Always look like cool rides. Been around forever, they know how to build rides.

The Cube looks more like the value for money bike. A good mix of nice frames, average mix of lower end high quality pieces and mid range components. Good hydraulic brakes, Shimano hubs and gears (good) not sure about cranksets, you'll need to find out about availability and price there, as already stated, these chainsets & bottom brackets do wear out in a couple of thousand miles dependent on use.

If it was me, draw up a list of what you'll want the bike for and where you will use it, around how many miles you'll use it per year and how much is your top end. Also factor in the possibility you'll enjoy it and wouldn't then have to upgrade to better as this will lose you money in the longer term. Do look at the rims are they double walled, what size are the wheel spokes as they need to be thicker too; in case you are an animal and will be bumping up and off curbs! Naughty...

Remember: Strong - Light - Cheap. You can only ever choose 2...

e.g Strong & light, means it ain't cheap!

If you are going to use a bike for 90% road, with occasional green lanes, I'd go for a Trekking bike like this

150400_light_zoom.jpg

Try and get the 29'er version for a softer ride if available and affordable, it comes fitted with all weather protection and carriers so you could attach panniers.

Giant Bicycles used to do an excellent version of this, very comfortable. Do invest in some wet weather gear, Endura cycling gear is good quality and most importantly breathable. All bike shops are on around 30% mark ups for bicycles; some up to 45%, best bet for negotiations, negotiate hard on accessories, that's where retailers make big margins, we used to make up to 150% on certain items... Finally, find a dealer that listens to your questions, plenty don't, find one you feel you can trust and take one for a test drive.

Happy wobbling riding! :^

P.S. - Bag yourself a great package and cycle happy. On the above model, definitely negotiate replacement of seat post for a suspension model: like this... It takes the sting out of your bum when hitting bumps!

This might be useful reading too: If not already seen? https://www.cyclescheme.co.uk/community/round-ups/round-up-hub-geared-hybrids

127007-497621_1_Supersize.jpg

Edited by parcelmonkey
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4 hours ago, parcelmonkey said:

LONG POST AHEAD - Much to say...

Excellent news: the best bit of advice is go sit on some and see how they feel to you and your body frame. Dependent on your torso, the reach to the handlebars will either feel too much of a stretch or not.

Some further news, belt drives are quieter in operation and of course cleaner. However, they are not completely maintenance free, requiring perfect set up to run true and not slightly twisted, otherwise they can and do snap. The bottom brackets do wear out over time, especially if someone has over tensioned the belt. If you are dynamic with pedalling this can also cause some issues with belts snapping, however you'd have to be pushing hard. They are not that great in muddy or dusty conditions as this can cause issues with clogging.

The other downside is gear ratios, very little choice, so ensure the ratios are right for you and the terrain you'll be travelling on. The upside to hub gears, you can change gears at the lights without moving, derailleurs need you to be pedaling to change gears and I've seen people in the wrong chainset cog and rear cogs often, which causes chains to wear prematurely.

700C wheels are less compliant on the road, compared to 29'ers which roll better and absorb bumps better but are slightly slower to get up to speed. Bigger more cushioned tyres which means you don't require suspension forks.

Marin bikes have always had a name & prices to match, nice looking bikes, good frames, comfortable rides but normally cheaper components.

Cannondale, excellent rides, creaky frames always, ride one to see what I mean, the lefty fork can be off-putting to some as it's a single fork to the left side, can be expensive in parts. Unless you're spending more money, at your lower price points, chain derailleurs (messy) and cable operated hydraulic brakes, not as good as hydraulic and will need adjusting more regularly. You either love 'em or hate them. Always look like cool rides. Been around forever, they know how to build rides.

The Cube looks more like the value for money bike. A good mix of nice frames, average mix of lower end high quality pieces and mid range components. Good hydraulic brakes, Shimano hubs and gears (good) not sure about cranksets, you'll need to find out about availability and price there, as already stated, these chainsets & bottom brackets do wear out in a couple of thousand miles dependent on use.

If it was me, draw up a list of what you'll want the bike for and where you will use it, around how many miles you'll use it per year and how much is your top end. Also factor in the possibility you'll enjoy it and wouldn't then have to upgrade to better as this will lose you money in the longer term. Do look at the rims are they double walled, what size are the wheel spokes as they need to be thicker too; in case you are an animal and will be bumping up and off curbs! Naughty...

Remember: Strong - Light - Cheap. You can only ever choose 2...

e.g Strong & light, means it ain't cheap!

If you are going to use a bike for 90% road, with occasional green lanes, I'd go for a Trekking bike like this

150400_light_zoom.jpg

Try and get the 29'er version for a softer ride if available and affordable, it comes fitted with all weather protection and carriers so you could attach panniers.

Giant Bicycles used to do an excellent version of this, very comfortable. Do invest in some wet weather gear, Endura cycling gear is good quality and most importantly breathable. All bike shops are on around 30% mark ups for bicycles; some up to 45%, best bet for negotiations, negotiate hard on accessories, that's where retailers make big margins, we used to make up to 150% on certain items... Finally, find a dealer that listens to your questions, plenty don't, find one you feel you can trust and take one for a test drive.

Happy wobbling riding! :^

P.S. - Bag yourself a great package and cycle happy. On the above model, definitely negotiate replacement of seat post for a suspension model: like this... It takes the sting out of your bum when hitting bumps!

This might be useful reading too: If not already seen? https://www.cyclescheme.co.uk/community/round-ups/round-up-hub-geared-hybrids

127007-497621_1_Supersize.jpg

Wow - thanks for taking the time to post that, it has really helped.

I've set a budget of about £800, which becomes nearer £500 with the tax break applied.

The Cube Hyde Pro seems to tick all the boxes (on paper, at least), and a local shop has stock so I'll go and try one out.

I'm definitely going to need mudguards (and a rear rack would be very handy), so I will follow your advice and negotiate over the accessories. A suspension seat post sounds like a good idea.

Well, plenty to think about. I am sold on the idea of hub gears and belt drive - in my youth I used to dread messing with a derailleur. Mind you, I only had cheap ones.

Many thanks for the advice.

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Hub gears and a belt drive will likely push you past the £1,000 limit...

As per my previous post the BMC is an excellent bike, very well spec’d But you need to add £250 to it as it’s £1,250 total but has these. Retailer is Evans for the best deal and they accept cycle scheme. 

I did look at the list on your link (before I read rest of stream suggesting you are not limited to these). My pick of these, which don’t have hub gears or belt drives, would be the Cannondale badboy as that’d set you back £800 which would allow you to buy the rest of the kit you’ll need and stay inside voucher limit. Canny’s are very well built (my current wheels are Cannondale SupersixEvo full carbon fibre and heavily upgraded), they also hold their value incredibly well comparatively to other bikes so are easy to sell if it’s not for you. However, as before invest in a good lock. 

I also forgot to add - make sure you have puncture proof tyres - this is a necessity as nothing more annoying than punctures. If you go for a hybrid with 700c wheels a decent set are Gatorskin by continental and come in 25 width which is more forgiving on the road. Cheapest place I’ve found for kit is online and called Wiggle, but you couldn’t use voucher so would need to buy these yourself.

Suggest going to some shops and having a look.

Also, please double check the rules... I have personally, twice, bought bikes on scheme which were prev years paint job, then further discounted ‘to clear’ stock, then managed to add cycle scheme discount to these on top - making the final price somewhat of a steal. One of these I rocked around for two years then sold for more than I’d ended up paying!

happy shopping and happy to further help if you have any questions.

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1 hour ago, Amormusic said:

Hub gears and a belt drive will likely push you past the £1,000 limit...

As per my previous post the BMC is an excellent bike, very well spec’d But you need to add £250 to it as it’s £1,250 total but has these. Retailer is Evans for the best deal and they accept cycle scheme. 

I did look at the list on your link (before I read rest of stream suggesting you are not limited to these). My pick of these, which don’t have hub gears or belt drives, would be the Cannondale badboy as that’d set you back £800 which would allow you to buy the rest of the kit you’ll need and stay inside voucher limit. Canny’s are very well built (my current wheels are Cannondale SupersixEvo full carbon fibre and heavily upgraded), they also hold their value incredibly well comparatively to other bikes so are easy to sell if it’s not for you. However, as before invest in a good lock. 

I also forgot to add - make sure you have puncture proof tyres - this is a necessity as nothing more annoying than punctures. If you go for a hybrid with 700c wheels a decent set are Gatorskin by continental and come in 25 width which is more forgiving on the road. Cheapest place I’ve found for kit is online and called Wiggle, but you couldn’t use voucher so would need to buy these yourself.

Suggest going to some shops and having a look.

Also, please double check the rules... I have personally, twice, bought bikes on scheme which were prev years paint job, then further discounted ‘to clear’ stock, then managed to add cycle scheme discount to these on top - making the final price somewhat of a steal. One of these I rocked around for two years then sold for more than I’d ended up paying!

happy shopping and happy to further help if you have any questions.

Thanks, much appreciated.

You prompted me to look more closely at the way the scheme works, and I don't think the Cycle Solutions website explains it very well. It turns out that I can buy the bike from another retailer from the list on the CS website (there are about 8 shops listed in my area), but I'd have to submit the price quote to Cycle Solutions who would then do the admin side with my employer. I'm not sure how heavily discounted bikes fit in, but will phone CS tomorrow to clarify the whole process.

I think a budget of about £800 for the bike seems sensible, as it leaves money for accessories.

I've found two bikes with hub gears and belt drive within my budget: Cube Hyde Pro (£799) and Marin Presidio 2/3 (£700/£850). If you have any thoughts about those, I'm all ears.

In line with your comments above, some of the local shops are advertising some heroic discounts on last year's/ex display (etc) models, so I might well chance my arm and see if a bargain can be had.

Examples:

https://www.cyclesurgery.com/p/cube-ex-demo-ex-display-hyde-race-2017-Q3214324.html?colour=3595

https://www.startfitness.co.uk/outlet/bike-clearance/cannondale-2017-quick-2-mens-hybrid-bike-blue-c31257m20.html

https://www.startfitness.co.uk/cycle/bikes/cannondale-2018-bad-boy-4-mens-hybrid-bike-black-c33407m10.html

https://www.startfitness.co.uk/cycle/bikes/scott-2017-sub-sport-10-mens-hybrid-bike-grey-249783.html

Cheers

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Cool. Am watching BGT with the kids. Will cruise the links 2moz and let you know what I think. 

Deffo check out the rules though. As said I’ve managed to get discount upon discount before so unless rules changed this is a great way of doing it. 

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Posted (edited)

It’s a very personal choice and your moneys yours. However of the suggestions you’ve given (links and written), I personally would go for the Marin Presido 3. The cube, whilst fine, rolls on fat 29 wheels which are slower and sluggish to get up to speed and if your doing mostly urban/road/paths pointless. Better to plump for 700c road bike style wheels and stick some 25 width decent tyres on. 

The discount bikes I would rule out for various reasons: one has V-brakes - spend extra and get a bike with hydraulic brakes as you should only need to buy once if buy well and they are different league for stopping power. The one with “a noisy but mechanically sound hub”...mmm... no thanks, that puts me off straight away. 

To go with whichever bike you choose I’d get a Kryptonite Evolution Mini D-Lock (or better than this i.e. New York), then some decent mudguards and lights. 

Oh and if you haven’t got one, get a good helmet. Specialized makes some decent, not too expensive, helmets.

Happy shopping. Let us know what you choose and how you get on.

*edited for final tip...

Floor standing bike pumps are good and quickest/easiest to blow up tyres. Always makes sure tyres are well inflated as this makes cycling a million times easier - for a bike with 700c tyres you’ll want 80-100psi in them (the harder the more road vibration but less contact area = quicker and easier to cycle), but check the wall rims of whichever tyres you’ve got for guidance. 

Edited by Amormusic
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Thanks Amormusic and Parcelmonkey - I now have a much better idea of what's what.

I spoke to Cycle Solutions (again) to ask why so many of the bikes on their website are out of stock. It transpires that the 2020 ranges will be released quite soon, so I'm going to wait and see if I can score a bargain on a 2019 model.

I'm 5'6", which would seem to be right on the margin between a small and a medium frame size. That being the case, is there a consensus as to whether it's better to go for small frame and adjust everything upwards or a medium frame with everything adjusted downwards?

Cheers

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14 minutes ago, horace said:

Thanks Amormusic and Parcelmonkey - I now have a much better idea of what's what.

I spoke to Cycle Solutions (again) to ask why so many of the bikes on their website are out of stock. It transpires that the 2020 ranges will be released quite soon, so I'm going to wait and see if I can score a bargain on a 2019 model.

I'm 5'6", which would seem to be right on the margin between a small and a medium frame size. That being the case, is there a consensus as to whether it's better to go for small frame and adjust everything upwards or a medium frame with everything adjusted downwards?

Cheers

I bow out on this one and highly recommend you get yourself to a bike shop and sit on both sizes of bike and then decide. 

I’m 5”11 so am neither size, however my Mrs is 5”1 and on a small and it really is very small (to me). 

Initial thought would be the med size, but do try both out by sitting on them. 

When you do get one make sure you have the seat as high as pos where you can reasonably turn pedals, again this is less effort - get the shop to help you set it up properly the first time. 

...get yourself into a shop and have a gander at what they’ve got, sit on a few of both sizes and see what you reckon. 

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13 minutes ago, horace said:

Thanks Amormusic and Parcelmonkey - I now have a much better idea of what's what.

I'm 5'6", which would seem to be right on the margin between a small and a medium frame size. That being the case, is there a consensus as to whether it's better to go for small frame and adjust everything upwards or a medium frame with everything adjusted downwards?

Cheers

Every frame is slightly different with length of top tube, angle of headstock and of course length of pedal arms. If it was me, the best solution is to sit on it and feel how you sit. A longer top tube will force you forward meaning more pressure on wrists, trapezius muscle and neck. A shorter top tube means you sit up more.

If the shop has a frame for optimum position even better! At 5 foot 6 I'd expect a crank (pedal arm) arm length of 170mm instead of 175mm as standard but again it depends on leg length. 31inch inside leg is ok for 175mm less you would benefit from 170mm length.

Steeper headstock angle, faster turn but more twitchy frame. Shallower angle, more stable the bike at speed but less responsive. Horses for courses and depends on what you want.

Take all information offered, ask the right questions for you and make sure the sales person listens.

Happy pedalling! 🚴‍♂️

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3 minutes ago, Amormusic said:

When you do get one make sure you have the seat as high as pos where you can reasonably turn pedals.

Incorrect advice! Best solution for average set up. Take shoe off. Bike stationary. Sit on seat. Place foot flat on pedal not at toes no tilt. Leg should now be almost straight. Put shoes on.

When toes on pedal leg should now have a slight angle and see how it feels. If hips move too much or bum comes off seat you're too high; adjust to make comfortable.

Your leg should absorb energy not be fully stretched when pedalling as you can knacker knees quickly.

If too much angle not enough energy transmitted through pedals and hips will hurt.

But arse & perrinium will always hurt until you develop resistance to exercise. Red faces mean you're at least trying to cycle up a hill... 😂

Enjoy!

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26 minutes ago, parcelmonkey said:

Incorrect advice! Best solution for average set up. Take shoe off. Bike stationary. Sit on seat. Place foot flat on pedal not at toes no tilt. Leg should now be almost straight. Put shoes on.

When toes on pedal leg should now have a slight angle and see how it feels. If hips move too much or bum comes off seat you're too high; adjust to make comfortable.

Your leg should absorb energy not be fully stretched when pedalling as you can knacker knees quickly.

If too much angle not enough energy transmitted through pedals and hips will hurt.

But arse & perrinium will always hurt until you develop resistance to exercise. Red faces mean you're at least trying to cycle up a hill... 😂

Enjoy!

Get the shop to help you set it up properly IS the right advice.

Yes agree with what you say, however the amount of people I see riding around with their knees pretty much buried in chin where they are so low is ridiculous. 

As high as is comfortable, and over distance, is best for least effort. 

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8 minutes ago, Amormusic said:

Get the shop to help you set it up properly IS the right advice.

Yes agree with what you say, however the amount of people I see riding around with their knees pretty much buried in chin where they are so low is ridiculous. 

As high as is comfortable, and over distance, is best for least effort. 

As already stated. No need to complicate things, look to get average pedal position and ask shop for advice or fine tune from there. 

We're both right but one of us isn't wholly correct... :whistle:

:D

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