parcelmonkey

Inspiration & advice required for 3 storey small form extension

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I know we have architects and builders here on the Wam. Not expecting you to give your expertise wholly for free but looking for inspiration and or advice?

I'm buying a property in need of modernisation and internally the bathrooms are lacking. The lower ground floor has a small shower room next to the kitchen extension, the upper ground floor has a toilet and sink and upper floor nothing apart from the window. I'm looking for a bathroom on upper ground floor big enough for a small bath, wet room on lower ground floor and at least a toilet on top floor.

The previous owner has installed a glass roofed small extension which would be a shame to knock down but I feel it could be added to with a triple storey extension to add some depth and style to overcome these issues, especially looking smarter to get rid of the ghastly downpipes and drainage. Pods or three storey brick extension? Cladding ideas or thoughts in general mainly to add some style and stand out a little.

I have a fairly realistic budget for build costs and wondered what issues I might face...

Cheers,

Ade

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If you go straight up from the glass roof extension wall it will stick out further than the neighbours and might incur a "right to light" law . :dunno:

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23 hours ago, Bazzer said:

If you go straight up from the glass roof extension wall it will stick out further than the neighbours and might incur a "right to light" law . :dunno:

We weren't planning on doing so as you rightly suggest it will possibly impinge on the neighbours light.

Originally, I was thinking of just extending upwards of the small rooms, there are three and this would mainly improve the bathrooms in the house.

However, a brief chat with a builder has told me this will be costly, time consuming and a logistical headache. We have alternative ideas which are more achievable and less costly, however all thoughts are appreciated.

I'd still like to tidy up the rear of the property as presently it looks pug ugly... :sick:

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Super Wammer

what a great project , i just renovated a property for a charity and it just sold . great fun .

also had interesting experience with right to light surveys . one cost 1500 pounds to do a full survey . didnt make any difference to the planners though . they still gave the project PP ! and now on second lot of solicitors ! if you see my kit up for sale , its probably to pay them , they charge about 900 quid for one letter !! ah what fun :D

curious why the bathroom drainage [white pipe ] does not go into the main pipe going down . all needs tidying up . nice to see the very strong fencing at the side of the property . do you have rear access for skips etc? or does it all have to go through the house ? 

the house i just renovated was 3 storey and just had a bathroom and toilet on lower floor . so folks had to travel down from top floor to use the toilet . so that was a bit of a pain . I can sympathise with you wanting a toilet on top floor 

some more internal pics would be great , hard to get a grip on matters without them 

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Super Wammer

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3 hours ago, hifinutt said:

Curious why the bathroom drainage [white pipe ] does not go into the main pipe going down . all needs tidying up . nice to see the very strong fencing at the side of the property . do you have rear access for skips etc? or does it all have to go through the house ? 

some more internal pics would be great , hard to get a grip on matters without them 

Unfortunately no rear access I can see presently, although the rear backs on to some allotments so I will investigate further as it's a possibility. Rear bathroom drainage looks like it tees in to the black pipe, I reckon a lazy plumbing job there...

No internal photos yet as we have just had an offer accepted and now await exchange with fingers & toes crossed, our buyer is a bit flaky, so potential pitfalls exist...

Thanks for the link to the book Phil, should be a great help. :^

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Super Wammer

Hope it all goes well, sounds exciting

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Super Wammer

@parcelmonkey I am an architect and I usually first go through with my clients about what they expect to achieve from an extension, how will it affect the internal layout and working of the house, can it be done in a way so that it feels as if it was always meant to be that way. Too many just 'build and extension' and that is exactly how it feels inside, often without improving the internal space and sometimes making it worse. On upper floors in particular one often has to forfeit a room in order to get through to the new extension which is counter productive.

In terms of light to neighbours, there is are standards set out about light to neighbours habitable rooms in Building Research publications but often local authorities will take a simple 45 degree rule to assess whether there is loss of amenity to neighbours. Sometimes they even publish this as guidance so it is worth asking them if they have any guidelines. Be aware though that sometimes the planning officer will assess on a case by case basis and might conclude that an extension is overbearing even if technically you think it complies.

I can see that one of your neighbours has a two story extension and also an extension at ground floor level and there might therefore be some party wall issues. This does not inevitably mean that you have to launch into full blown party wall procedure as you might be able to handle it by a simple exchange of letters.

But my main advice is to start from what you want to achieve internally first rather than ending up with and extension and then try to work out how you are going to use it. It sounds simple but too many do it the wrong way round.

There is a formal method of getting Pre Application advice from the planners and for which a fee is chargeable and this might be worthwhile if you are in any doubt about whther you might get permission.

Hope that helps for starters.

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20 minutes ago, Fourlegs said:

@parcelmonkey I am an architect and I usually first go through with my clients about what they expect to achieve from an extension, how will it affect the internal layout and working of the house, can it be done in a way so that it feels as if it was always meant to be that way. Too many just 'build and extension' and that is exactly how it feels inside, often without improving the internal space and sometimes making it worse.

In terms of light to neighbours, there is are standards set out about light to neighbours habitable rooms in Building Research publications but often local authorities will take a simple 45 degree rule to assess whether there is loss of amenity to neighbours. Sometimes they even publish this as guidance so it is worth asking them if they have any guidelines. Be aware though that sometimes the planning officer will assess on a case by case basis and might conclude that an extension is overbearing even if technically you think it complies.

I can see that one of your neighbours has a two story extension and also an extension at ground floor level and there might therefore be some party wall issues. This does not inevitably mean that you have to launch into full blown party wall procedure as you might be able to handle it by a simple exchange of letters.

But my main advice is to start from what you want to achieve internally first rather than ending up with and extension and then try to work out how you are going to use it. It sounds simple but too many do it the wrong way round.

There is a formal method of getting Pre Application advice from the planners and for which a fee is chargeable and this might be worthwhile if you are in any doubt about whther you might get permission.

Hope that helps for starters.

Thanks for the very helpful pointers. I'd hoped you'd pitch in.

Internally we would gain little living space but would improve bathroom sizes and an extra toilet. My main objective was to tidy up the rear. Looking at it critically, costs would prohibit the build as new footings would need to be installed, these would be dug by hand as no rear vehicle access so very costly.

Also, looking at the roof pitch, I don't think I could extend the rear as I can't gain extra height of roofline due to next floor's window header.

I've looked at instead removing the horrible glass roof that gives it a conservatory look and will be investigating the newer plastic envirotiles with extra insulation. Possibly installing velux in roof x2 & bi-fold doors. Internally taking advice re removing a wall, and reducing bedroom count by 1 and gaining another bathroom and en-suite hopefully.

We can always increase bedroom count to 4 again with loft extension if required and still come in under what an extension outside would've cost.

Party wall advice is good so will be speaking with a structural engineer as I would like to remove chimneys if poss whilst doing other alterations.

Thanks again!

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Super Wammer
Posted (edited)

Some sage advice,  I have had some very helpful advice from the party wall support line surveyors even today ( I have 3 involved currently)

Edited by hifinutt

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