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macfan

Moving a new LP12

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Hello all -

Just received the 1st photo of my new custom plinth for my LP12 project. It is not finished yet - just in a raw just assembled state - but a sign it is getting close. Next few days will see the finishing touches. Over the next few weeks final assembly will take place and then I will need to move it about 200 miles back to my home. I have read a few pointers on transporting but wanted to see if anyone had some tips to share. Here is what I am thinking right now:

  1. Remove outer platter - keep it separate and transport in original box or packaging
  2. Raise but do not remove inner platter
  3. Remove belt - making sure to mark it so one can now which side faces out
  4. Place something soft but firm under the inner platter for support such as a few new unused sponges about 15mm in height to support the inner plater
  5. Do not remove inner plater to keep dust out of the bearing assembly and to keep oil in
  6. Keep suspension from moving around by placing something soft but firm like a thin polystyrene sheet in-between the arm board (Kore) and the plinth. Helps keep plinth looking good as well.
  7. Ensure tonearm is in it's clip and also tie down arm to the arm rest as well (Akito 3b in my case)
  8. Ensure stylus guard is in place (Krystal - has a pretty cool way this works)
  9. Ensure motor power lead and tonearm cable to not make direct contact with the TT

Travel time will be about 3.5 hours. Temp will most likely be around 80F or 28C or so. Humidity in the 60% range but could be as low as 45%. Travel will be by car, but I could rent an SUV. Not sure how to secure the box to keep it from sliding around. There is about a 2,000 foot or 610 meter elevation with a fairly steep 6% grade between here and there (Atlanta, GA)

Just want to be sure nothing gets out of alignment on the trip home. Any suggestions would be great. 

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Macfan,

packing plan looks good. I would move the passenger seat forwards as far as it goes and transport the LP12 on that. Use the seatbelt. Pack cushions or pillows around it so that it can’t slide forwards. Finally, do your best to avoid large pot holes!

Have fun.

Stu

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, macfan said:

Hello all -

Just received the 1st photo of my new custom plinth for my LP12 project. It is not finished yet - just in a raw just assembled state - but a sign it is getting close. Next few days will see the finishing touches. Over the next few weeks final assembly will take place and then I will need to move it about 200 miles back to my home. I have read a few pointers on transporting but wanted to see if anyone had some tips to share. Here is what I am thinking right now:

  1. Remove outer platter - keep it separate and transport in original box or packaging
  2. Raise but do not remove inner platter
  3. Remove belt - making sure to mark it so one can now which side faces out
  4. Place something soft but firm under the inner platter for support such as a few new unused sponges about 15mm in height to support the inner plater
  5. Do not remove inner plater to keep dust out of the bearing assembly and to keep oil in
  6. Keep suspension from moving around by placing something soft but firm like a thin polystyrene sheet in-between the arm board (Kore) and the plinth. Helps keep plinth looking good as well.
  7. Ensure tonearm is in it's clip and also tie down arm to the arm rest as well (Akito 3b in my case)
  8. Ensure stylus guard is in place (Krystal - has a pretty cool way this works)
  9. Ensure motor power lead and tonearm cable to not make direct contact with the TT

Travel time will be about 3.5 hours. Temp will most likely be around 80F or 28C or so. Humidity in the 60% range but could be as low as 45%. Travel will be by car, but I could rent an SUV. Not sure how to secure the box to keep it from sliding around. There is about a 2,000 foot or 610 meter elevation with a fairly steep 6% grade between here and there (Atlanta, GA)

Just want to be sure nothing gets out of alignment on the trip home. Any suggestions would be great. 

Looks like you've got it well covered.

One little thing to be aware of, that may or may not apply with your deck.

Sometimes if the outer platter is transported in it's "tray" at the bottom of the box , the screws securing the baseboard of the assembled deck  above may touch and mark the platter edge.

A sheet  of cardboard or removal of the middle  baseboard screws for shipping will avoid the issue.

[Not sure whether the above still applies with the current packing ...but no harm in being aware ]

Edited by Smokestack
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Don't forget to remove the tonearm weight!

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An alternative to leaving the inner platter in place is to lift it out, pack it securely, and use the red bearing cap supplied with the deck to keep the oil in and dust out. If you do this with care you probably won't need to top up the oil.

David

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The suggestions here are all good.  But in addition you need to account for the fact that the seat bottoms in cars slant down toward the back.  You want to keep the LP12 as level as possible to minimize any oil loss (if keeping the inner platter raised and in place, which is what I do) so you want it level.  I keep an old bath towel in the car which I fold and roll up to keep the LP12 as level as possible.  On cars with 12 way adjustable seats I further adjust the seat to get it level.  I would also wrap the seat belt around the unit as an extra precaution.  The belt should be marked not only for outside vs. inside but also top vs. bottom as that is audible as well.

I have now traveled to 4 Hi-Fi shows with two LP12s, one on a car seat and one on the floor.  Three of these were to Denver, an 1100 mile trip one way and the latest was to Schaumberg, IL a drive of 265 miles.  I had swap out a Urika for a Trampolin 2 on my Klimax LP12 after this trip and I did fine tune the suspension a touch, but back home it is still fine.  Otherwise both LP12s needed no tuning after any of the trips.  I have also had customers drive me LP12s from a number of cities, some as far away as Raleigh, NC which is about 670 miles.  They all have arrived happily still singing at their destinations.  So I suspect that, with the reasonable care you are planning on, you should have no problems.

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Thanks for the additional tips.

Tendaberry: Thanks for the reminder. Removing the tonearm weight was on the list of things to do but I overlooked it in my list. I often write all my ideas down on napkins in restaurants. I never eat at home. The origins of my LP12 was on a napkin at a place I go all the time. WiFi - MacBook Pro - Napkins - Tea. Get lots done.

ThomasOK: Good points on kept it level. I think I am either going to use my trunk or rent an SUV as I will have a travel companion for the trip. Will be using original box for the most part. I can rig something up to keep it from sliding around. Perhaps pushing the box all the way in to it reaches the back seat (which does not fold down) and then using a very large patient warming blanket  to help keep it from sliding. It is heavy thick material and large. Should be able towrope this around box base to keep it snug. I have had this in my truck for years and it barely moves at all. 

Smokestack: Good detail oriented tip. We be sure to look at this. 

This trip can be a bit harrowing at times as this stretch of road folks drive really fast. Keep up speed is usually 85mph / 136 kph no matter the conditions. Just going to take it easy and check on things every so often on the way back. 

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I am not so sure about the soft but firm under the inner platter. I usually pick a couple of similar height soft back novels and support the inner platter with these.

Take off the tonearm weight  if you know how to reposition it and then set tracking force. There are how to guides out there. Personally I don't bother.

A Linn purist will also tell you transport in the Linn box. They are clearly spot on and should be listened too

Now for my questions. Where is the plinth from? What is driving your choice? And Kore,Akito,Crystal did you audition Keel plus Akito and Adikt? I am running Keel,Ekos,and... Troika and I love it. 

Good luck with the move 😁

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FlatEarth_Sandgate: Thanks for your input. To answer your questions

  1. Linn dealer is going to get me an original Linn box to help with transportation. We do not have one since this is essentially built up from parts rather than starting from a complete TT and adding to it.
  2. Plinth is a Woodsong built by Chris Harban. He is actually still finishing up but it should be here a few weeks or so. The wood is Madagascar Ebony. I found my way to Chris from the old Linn forum. We both live in the US so working directly was easy to do. This part of the project is about 8 months in the making. Very excited to get it.
  3. Choice for the plinth was directed by wanting to do something unique and special but also a wood that will make a good foundation for a Linn LP12. After looking at many pictures and discussing my goals with Chris we arrived at the choice. At one point I had considered both a Koa and Snakewood/Ebony combo.
  4. The technical aspects are Radikal Akurate / Kore / Trampolin 2 / Akito 3B / Krystal. 
  5. Was not able to audition Keel / Akito / Adkit but when considering a upgrade to an Akurate level TT it was almost unanimous that the Radikal motor would be the best investment. Sine this is a new build it made sense to me to go ahead and get the inner components correct - so hence the jump to Radikal.

I will live with this configuration for a while and and at some point will do the Ekos update but this project has gotten more expensive than I had originally planned. That being said, when sitting in the dealers listening room we were able to easily switch between a Majik and an Akurate. This was not a subtle difference. The Akurate was much more musically involving and reduced listening quite a bit. We ended up listening to several sides of my favorite albums all afternoon. Did not take long to come to the conclusion the Akurate was the way to go. The Radikal ended up being value added with the current promotion.

The plinth is an acknowledged luxury but make my LP12 special to me.

Blue skies -  

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macfan:  Mind sharing which dealer you are using to build up the new LP12?

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Most people are screaming out for good dealers especially outside the uk where there seems to be a bit of a drought.

I'm sure your dealer would be appreciative of a thumbs up recommendation.

Not  really fair to big up a dealer then keep it to yourself.:whistle:

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The only person, except myself, who I would trust poking around in my LP12 is Peter @ Cymbiosis. Unfortunately we have the North Sea between us.....

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Thanks.  That's only about 6 hours from me(!)  Unfortunately, ThomasOK is too far to travel to get any LP12 work done  :(

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Just got back from picking up my very custom LP12 from Lawson. Everything is great and this is a wonderful sounding LP12. Spent yesterday listening and learning. Today was the official pickup and getting her home from Atlanta. This went well and my new LP12 is home safe and sound. Downside - my McIntosh C70 just died on me and now needs to be replaced so I will have a few days wait till it is up and running.

If you need work done I would suggest giving Lawson a call. Very easy to work with as he was more than patient with my year long project. Always went out of his way to accommodate my requests including never directly touching the plinth and to use cloth gloves. This was the suggestion of the plinth builder Chris Harban. 

Recommended.

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