Sgt Pepper

Loudness Wars Question

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Most if not all of my CD's sound fantastic, so what or how do you tell if you have a problematic recording?

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2 hours ago, Sgt Pepper said:

how do you tell if you have a problematic recording?

are you confusing recording with pressing quality , CD's are not going to suffer from the same things as vinyl all will play and sound good IMO .

Anyway I thin k this is one for 2 Channel Baz .

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10 minutes ago, Bazzer said:

are you confusing recording with pressing quality , CD's are not going to suffer from the same things as vinyl all will play and sound good IMO .

Anyway I thin k this is one for 2 Channel Baz .

Been hearing loads about the loudness wars but not sure how you can tell if a particular CD has this problem?

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Just now, Sgt Pepper said:

loudness wars

Not sure what that is ?

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Super Wammer

IT'S WHEN RECORDINGS ARE  DYNAMICALLY COMPRESSED AND EQ'D TO DEATH :)

You can read more on it here.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness_war

Edited by greybeard
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Super Wammer

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2 hours ago, Sgt Pepper said:

Most if not all of my CD's sound fantastic, so what or how do you tell if you have a problematic recording?

Most of my experience of the loudness thing has been with remastered CDs - too compressed. The end result is it makes it sound unnatural.

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So looking at this list, Red is bad Green good?

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33 minutes ago, Sgt Pepper said:

So looking at this list, Red is bad Green good?

No, that's too simplistic. It's just one factor of many. For example the remastered Steely Dan albums are more compressed yet the overall sound is far better.

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1 hour ago, greybeard said:

IT'S WHEN RECORDINGS ARE  DYNAMICALLY COMPRESSED AND EQ'D TO DEATH :)

You can read more on it here.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudness_war

There are some genre's where this is a part of the sound, some darksynth musicians do the above deliberately to achieve the sound they want. (I don't buy the vinyl of that genre, digital all the way)

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If you have an original CD and a 'remastered' CD just play them back to back at the same volume setting and you will soon see what loudness means. Personally I loathe all this remastered malarkey, no dynamics and too loud.

Loudness is explained rather nicely in these clips: 

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21 minutes ago, J Macquarrie said:

There are some genre's where this is a part of the sound, some darksynth musicians do the above deliberately to achieve the sound they want. (I don't buy the vinyl of that genre, digital all the way)

It's not new. All the 60s Motown singles were very compressed and that's how they sound at their best. Vinyl is a more compressed medium of course, it has to be.

Edited by Muckplaster

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4 hours ago, Sgt Pepper said:

Most if not all of my CD's sound fantastic, so what or how do you tell if you have a problematic recording?

A good indicator is when the drums sound like a little tick and thump in the background.

If you want to hear a dynamic recording try Flim & the BB's  -Tricycle

You have to turn it right up to hear the quiet parts but the loud parts are LOUD !

Flim & the BB's TriCycle 1983 18 13 23 lossless CD
Flim & The BB's TriCycle 1983 18 13 22 lossless

Unknown

Edited by Electro
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Super Wammer
3 hours ago, Sgt Pepper said:

So looking at this list, Red is bad Green good?

Loosely speaking, that’s why they’ve labelled them that way. But you need to think about the type of music too. For example, punk rock, which is typically loud from start to finish will have a limited dynamic range.  Whereas a typical orchestral piece will have moments of relative quiet, often for several minutes or an entire movement, but also huge climaxes.  That’ll be a wide dynamic range.  

The ‘wars’ were influenced by radio stations leaping out when tuning, typically in a car radio, going back many years.  Compressed music sounds louder, but climaxes simply sound squashed and quiet passages are overly boosted.  Compare Classic FM with Radio 3 - similar content, but Classic is heavily compressed, while Radio 3 is compressed a bit during drive time shows, and very little for live concert relays. 

Sadly, CDs are often remastered with a higher average level. In CD’s early spdays, many recordings were relatively quiet, because for the first time there was no need to drown out vinyl noise or tape hiss.  That’s much rarer in 2018, but can still be found from good classical labels. 

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3 hours ago, Muckplaster said:

It's not new. All the 60s Motown singles were very compressed and that's how they sound at their best. Vinyl is a more compressed medium of course, it has to be.

Yet most vinyl has a larger dynamic range than cds released in the last 20 years, if you look on the drdatabase you will see. 

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