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Naughtilus

Choral Music

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+ Christus Vincit
+ Christus Regnat
+ Christus Imperat
+ Exaudi Christe!

Sequentia and Dialogos (Benjamin Bagby, director, Katarina Livljanić, director)

Christus vincit ('Laudes regiae')
Text: Paris, BNF, lat. 13149 ca. 796-800.
Melody: reconstruction by K.  Livljanić
based on Paris, lat. 1118, ca. 990.

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Origin:

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Laudes Regiæ

The Laudes Regiæ (English: Royal Praises or Royal Acclamations) is a hymn used in the rites of the Catholic Church. There are variant texts, but they most often begin with these words that give the hymn its alternative title: Christus vincit! Christus regnat! Christus imperat! (English: Christ conquers, Christ reigns, Christ commands).

The melody of the refrain is used as an interval signal for Vatican Radio's shortwave transmissions.

This hymn is sung in the Catholic Church at solemn events, such as the inauguration of a pope or, in centuries past, at the coronation of the Holy Roman Emperor. It consists of six sections and a refrain. It is one of the longest hymns. Laudes Regiæ has its origins in as far back as ancient Rome. When Roman leaders such as generals, emperors or consuls entered the Eternal City of Rome after triumph in a great battle, they were met by the chants of the people. Charlemagne, himself adopted Roman traditions for his own use. When he was crowned as Emperor of the Romans in 800A.D., he adopted Christus vincit, Christus regnat, Christus imperat, also called the Laudes Imperiale.

Most versions begin with the formula "Christus vincit! Christus regnat! Christus imperat!", followed by the invocation "Exaudi Christe" (Hear, Christ) and then an acclamation proper to the occasion, asking for long life for the emperor or pope. These phrases date from pre-Christian times and the addition of exclamations naming saints date to the eighth century.

Edited by Naughtilus
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Paul Hillier / Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir
The Powers of Heaven: Orthodox Music of the 17th & 18th Centuries

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Quote

The Powers of Heaven is the second recording Paul Hillier has made with the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, and it covers a sampling of Eastern Orthodox sacred literature dating from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These were the first centuries in which coherent literature was produced for Russian Orthodox choirs singing in Old Church Slavonic, and the arrival of Italian composers in the middle of the eighteenth century had a strong impact on this uniformly unaccompanied music; they too are represented in selections from Baldassare Galuppi and Giuseppe Sarti.

Giusseppe Sarti - Now The Powers of Heaven

Edited by Naughtilus

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@CnoEvil

Superb pick! :^

Edited by Naughtilus

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Britten: War Requiem
Galina Vishnevskaya / Benjamin Britten / Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau / London Symphony Orchestra / Peter Pears

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Was watching a political commentary videos last night. I found one particularly interesting because it puts Sir John Bagot Glubb's book "The fate of empires and Search for survival" in today's perspective. Played some music after, including this Britten masterpiece. 

Edited by Naughtilus
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A sample of (translated) lyrics:

From the lovely realms of the East
Clearly and joyful rose Venus, the Morning Star, and I
Enjoyed in the arms of my divine beloved
That pleasure no human mind can grasp.
When I heard, after an ardent sigh:
"Hope of my heart, sweet desire,
You go, alas, you leave me here alone. Farewell!
What shall become of me here, sad and sorrowful?
Alas, cruel love, your pleasures are indeed
Uncertain and brief, for while I yet enjoy you,
The greatest happiness ends in tears."
Unable to say any more, she held me tightly,
Repeating the embraces in more entwinings
Than ever were made by the ivy or acanthus.

Edited by Jobb
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Fascinating piece of modern choral including 3d sound recording.

https://shop.klicktrack.com/2l/439809

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Agnus Dei / Miserere Mei, Deus
The Choir Of New College, Oxford*, Edward Higginbottom (1996)

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Absolutely wonderful. Old favorite.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36Y_ztEW1NE

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This is some of the best Choral Music on the planet. IMO
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Great thread and looking forward to trying some of the suggestions.
I do like the Archiv recording of the Nelson Mass I forget if it's the English Concert or the Orchestra of Westminster Abbey. Pinnock or Preston.

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Currently listening to this myself.

Sacred Treasures - Choral Masterworks From Russia, 1998

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11 minutes ago, Lawrence001 said:

I do like the Archiv recording of the Nelson Mass I forget if it's the English Concert or the Orchestra of Westminster Abbey. Pinnock or Preston.

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I quite like this version...especially the  Little organ Mass.

Haydn - Nelson Mass; Kleine Orgelmesse by unknown (2000) Audio CD

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