wHIZZY

FM Tuner Advice

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4 hours ago, Ed Howarth said:

Just to drift the topic even more......  I had two TR6s with the Lucas petrol injection. I carried a toolkit in the boot and regularly had to clear particles from the injectors. And the pump regularly overheated on hot days and caused the fuel to cavitate. But the sound of that pump reaching pressure and the subsequent burble of a V6 through twin exhausts, with the top down on a summer's day. Aaaahhhh. 

Drift away.  But V6???!!!  Surely you mean straight six.  That was Triumph's best selling point;  not being a vee.  V6's were from those boys at Dagenham with their rather clattering valvegear as the mileage climbed beyond 70,000.  The Lucas (actually diesel) fuel pump, (also used as a wiper motor up front), would overheat in the heat of the sun unless the car's body paint was of a light colour, so one simply fitted a Robert Bosch one instead.  I now have a white '69 TR6 and love it (fairweather permitting) plus a '71 2000 mk2 that once belonged to James May, but being Sienna Brown his wife hated it so he had to sell it.  Should have filed for divorce.

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Super Wammer
5 hours ago, britishcomposers said:

Drift away.  But V6???!!!  Surely you mean straight six.  That was Triumph's best selling point;  not being a vee.  V6's were from those boys at Dagenham with their rather clattering valvegear as the mileage climbed beyond 70,000.  The Lucas (actually diesel) fuel pump, (also used as a wiper motor up front), would overheat in the heat of the sun unless the car's body paint was of a light colour, so one simply fitted a Robert Bosch one instead.  I now have a white '69 TR6 and love it (fairweather permitting) plus a '71 2000 mk2 that once belonged to James May, but being Sienna Brown his wife hated it so he had to sell it.  Should have filed for divorce.

Of course straight six. Doh, age. But 2 exhausts taking 3 cylinders each. Hence the burble. I extended the fuel inlet pipe and wrapped it around the body of the motor in an attempt to keep it cool. Looking back on it, I can see how safe that was! I had the pleasure of driving a mate's TR6 many years later and realised what a real handful it was. 

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2 minutes ago, Ed Howarth said:

Looking back on it, I can see how safe that was! I had the pleasure of driving a mate's TR6 many years later and realised what a real handful it was. 

They sold those coiled pipes as a modification, and remember how the exhaust's rear silencer sits just the other side of the boot floor to said fuel line & pump on the stock unit rather than being on the (safer) opposite side.  Twin pipes did sound tasty though.  

We'd better get back to topic or we'll both be in trouble! :D

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, britishcomposers said:

We'd better get back to topic or we'll both be in trouble! :D

That hasn't stopped anyone on the 'expensive' thread - I thought a little DSP might help correct the drift.

Edited by batteredhaggis
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Super Wammer
7 hours ago, britishcomposers said:

They sold those coiled pipes as a modification, and remember how the exhaust's rear silencer sits just the other side of the boot floor to said fuel line & pump on the stock unit rather than being on the (safer) opposite side.  Twin pipes did sound tasty though.  

We'd better get back to topic or we'll both be in trouble! :D

Live dangerously, plenty of time to get back on topic. I had a lovely red N reg TR6. It was the version that only had OD on 3rd and 4th. I was told that was because of idiots going along in OD 2nd at full chat and flicking it out of OD which sort of scrambled the bits of metal in the gearbox. With the large diameter wheels and straight 6 it was a lovely cruiser but going round corners required skill. Then I got a Lotus Elan Sprint DHC which could go round corners. All this was about 35 years ago

They both had FM radios though. Phew, saved.

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Super Wammer
On 20/03/2018 at 11:07, SergeAuckland said:

That in essence is how the Optimod system works. It has a broadband AGC that lifts everything, then band splitting, typically 5 ways, where in each band there are separate  AGC, compressors and limiters (if you want to drive them that hard). There are also all sorts of further tricks, like clipping the composite signal, then removing the distortion that causes.

It's actually an immensely sophisticated system that maximises loudness as well as allows a station to have a 'signature sound'. This is particularly important where RDS isn't used much, and people tuning across a dial, pick out their favourite station by its sound.  

One further thing is for regulatory reasons, however loud the sound, deviation of the FM carrier must not exceed 75kHz, so the skill of the designer is to make sure that overshoot is eliminated under all circumstances. 

The skill in setting up an Optimod comes in knowing what all the hundreds of individual controls do, and how they interact. I never got any good at setting these things up, just managed the Less/More control, but there are those people who act as Processing Consultants and travel around the World, setting up Processors for clients who want to achieve a certain result.  

Optimods would be unnecessary if FM radio was purely a HiFi medium, for people to listen to music in their music rooms, on decent wide-range loudspeakers, but as soon as portable FM radios and car radios became available, the dynamic range of FM was excessive and something needed to be done to restrict it, as well as creating a 'signature sound'.

It would have been much better if the dynamic range control had been fitted to receivers, but the radio industry was totally unwilling to increase their costs by even a few pence, and anyway, they thought it would be 'too complicated' for home users to understand, so left it to the Broadcasters.  This lamentable attitude was carried over to DAB, so DAB feeds are also processed as heavily as FM. 

A final comment about 30 minute stabilisation, no, I don't do it at all, I just switch on from cold and start playing music. Never noticed any difference whatsoever.

Good to see you back.

S.

Sorry chaps to bring  up the subject of tuners again but is internet radio sound any less processed than FM?

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10 hours ago, wHIZZY said:

Sorry chaps to bring  up the subject of tuners again but is internet radio sound any less processed than FM?

Depends on each station. Some, like Radio Swiss Jazz are not processed at all, but stream at 128k MP3, I don't think Radio Paradise is, at least, if they are, they do it very well indeed. 

BBC radio is processed, in a similar way to FM, as I presume they want listeners to hear the some sort of sound whatever the platform. Ideally, FM needs to be processed differently to digital delivery as it has different transmission properties, especially for LOUD stations, where every bit of loudness is used. 

For the record, I process RWSfm's stream the same as the FM output, but then I don't have the budget for a separate processor and our FM signal isn't too heavily processed. 

S  

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Posted (edited)

Edit

Edited by britishcomposers

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12 hours ago, wHIZZY said:

Sorry chaps to bring  up the subject of tuners again but is internet radio sound any less processed than FM?

All stations below are pretty good.  Some exceeding 192kbp/s (but none are below this standard) with the best at 320kbp/s Mpeg 3.  Some have very mild dynamic processing, some appear without.  Only BBC Radio 3 has the a.a.c. 320kbp/s standard combined with no dynamic compression applied.  Last years Henry Wood Promenade season went out on a trial FLAC uncompressed on-line test feed too.

France Musique   Classical/Jazz/other

FIP   Classical/Jazz/other

Linn Jazz  (UK)

Linn Classical  (UK)

RCO  (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra - Netherlands)  Classical live recorded content of same orchestra's output in-concert.

WGBH  (Boston Symphony Orchestra - USA)  Classical and the same principles as RCO above.

WDR 3  (Westdeutscher Rundfunk - Germany)  Classical

NRK Klassisk  (Norway)  Classical

Coolradio Jazz  (Germany)

The Jazz Knob  (USA)

Lucerne School of Music Jazz Radio  (Switzerland)

All Brass Radio  (UK)  Brass bands

Audiophile Jazz  (Greece)

Audiophile Classical  (Greece)

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Super Wammer

One more question,  does BBC Radio 2 actualy sound better in the late evening or is it just the effect of a single malt? 

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2 minutes ago, wHIZZY said:

One more question,  does BBC Radio 2 actualy sound better in the late evening or is it just the effect of a single malt? 

The latter, I'd say.

The sound gets peatier with a Lagavulin, sweeter with a Cardhu.

S

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