lordmortlock

Technics SL-10 - I want all of the information.

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I've always had a soft spot for this lovely looking TT. Are they actually any good? I know the posh original MC cart is a) superb and b) essentially unobtainium at sensible prices ... what other carts are considered at the top of the pmount tree?

Thanks for any help friends

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Apparently the SL10 is a very well built and fine sounding turntable which went for fairly big bucks back in the early eighties. I bought an SL7 last year as a second turntable and I was very surprised at how good it sounded. The SL7 was a stripped down version of the SL10 and, unlike the SL10, doesn't come with a built in MC phono stage. It works perfectly and is a testament of how well mainstream consumer electronics were built back then. I think the main issue with the SL10 is as you say the rarity of the Technics MC Cart so I'm not sure what alternatives you have at your disposal. I was able to get a cheap P mount MM cart for the SL7 and I have to day it sounds rather good. Personally, I think for the money, these old parallel trackers offer excellent sound per pound. I remember David Price in Hi FI world extolling the virtues of the SL5 a few years back.  Happy bargain hunting.

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20 hours ago, lordmortlock said:

I've always had a soft spot for this lovely looking TT. Are they actually any good? I know the posh original MC cart is a) superb and b) essentially unobtainium at sensible prices ... what other carts are considered at the top of the pmount tree?

Thanks for any help friends

It is a fine turntable and had the best poster ad in history (an SP10 with an HMV arm needle horn arrangement making it look like a wind up deck).. it is fabulous for radio and dj work as it goes from 0 to 33 or 0 to 45 virtually instantaneously .. however, with age the anodised aluminium tends to tarnish (have seen them resprayed with auto paint looking all gleaming and lovely) ..

BUT at the end of the day do you want it to be the best sounding turntable you can get,  or do you just want a good looking turntable that sounds good  .. the SP10 falls into the latter category it sounds good and looks good but will be outperformed by decks such as the LInn, Systemdek, Aristons, STDs, Heybrooks, Oracles, Pink Triange, .. much the same as the Garard 401 .. so you pays your money and you take your choice :) 

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Super Wammer
4 minutes ago, uzzy said:

It is a fine turntable and had the best poster ad in history (an SP10 with an HMV arm needle horn arrangement making it look like a wind up deck).. it is fabulous for radio and dj work as it goes from 0 to 33 or 0 to 45 virtually instantaneously .. however, with age the anodised aluminium tends to tarnish (have seen them resprayed with auto paint looking all gleaming and lovely) ..

BUT at the end of the day do you want it to be the best sounding turntable you can get,  or do you just want a good looking turntable that sounds good  .. the SP10 falls into the latter category it sounds good and looks good but will be outperformed by decks such as the LInn, Systemdek, Aristons, STDs, Heybrooks, Oracles, Pink Triange, .. much the same as the Garard 401 .. so you pays your money and you take your choice :) 

In what way 'outperformed'?

All those decks you list are OK, they go round more or less at the right speed, but they don't have instant start and being bouncy, are a pain to use. For me, therefore, the SP10 would perform better. That's why I use  EMT and AEG.

S.

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The OP asked about SL10's, so why are we talking about SP10's

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14 minutes ago, SergeAuckland said:

In what way 'outperformed'?

All those decks you list are OK, they go round more or less at the right speed, but they don't have instant start and being bouncy, are a pain to use. For me, therefore, the SP10 would perform better. That's why I use  EMT and AEG.

S.

That is why I use my ears and don't use one :) the bouncy sub-chassis of my turntable isolates it from vibrations and as I listen loud it is a mandatory requirement .. the EMT and SP10 was designed for Radio/DJ use where instantanous was a requirement .. I hasten to add of course that Thorens in there move to develop sound moved to a bouncy sub-chassis and with their own arms and the way it was set up it was no easy to induce bounce when using the inbuilt lift lower device .. this of course was the TD150 which was copied and impoved by Hamish Robertson to arrive at what eventually became the Linn Sondek.

13 minutes ago, wizmax said:

The OP asked about SL10's, so why are we talking about SP10's

Good spot - know nothing about the SL10 other than we didn't sell many in the day .. 

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Having experienced both solid and suspended decks, I have a clear preference for the former. I found continually that suspended decks were more prone to vibration compared to a solid deck with a high mass plinth.

Edited by oldius
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per Wiki .. 

The SL-10 was the first linear-tracking turntable to feature direct drive, a Technics innovation dating back to 1969 with the SP-10 Mk I. The SL-10, along with its fully programmable stablemate the SL-15, was able to penetrate the consumer electronics market much more effectively than any preceding linear-tracking turntable, and it spawned a wave of imitators throughout the 1980s, along with many derivations by Technics itself.

Unlike many of the inexpensive designs that followed it, the SL-10 is cast from aluminum and weighs 6.5 kg. Its chassis is the same size as a standard LP jacket, doing away with the large plinth, visible tonearm and general bulk associated with conventional radial-tracking turntables that the public was familiar with up to that point.

The SL-10 came equipped with the Technics EPS-310MC moving-coil cartridge. Due to the low output of the moving-coil cartridge, the SL-10 includes a built-in, bypassable step-up preamp to allow it to connect to standard phono inputs. The original Technics EPS-310MC moving-coil cartridge was designed to be replaced as a unit; the stylus was not removable. The cartridge has since been discontinued; the SL-10 will accept any P-mount/T4P cartridge. The SL-10 is capable of being powered by an external DC power adapter or a standard AC power supply. The motor is quartz-locked, providing accurate rotational speed.

Perhaps the SL-10's most unusual feature is its ability to play records in any position, even vertical. With the lid closed, the SL-10's internal disc clamp holds the record in place, and the tonearm, being dynamically balanced, maintains a consistent tracking force regardless of the turntable position.

An example of the SL-10 is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.[1]

Specifications[edit]

Platter Type: 300mm diameter die-cast aluminium[2]
Speed Accuracy: +/- 0.002%
Wow and Flutter: 0.025%
Rumble: -78 dB
Tonearm Type: Dynamic balanced linear tracking gimbal suspension
Effective Tonearm Length: 105mm
Original Cartridge: EPC-310MC
Cartridge Frequency Response: 10 to 60,000 Hz
Dimensions: 315 x 88 x 315mm
Weight: 6.5kg

1 minute ago, oldius said:

Having experienced both solid and suspended decks, I have a clear preference for the latter. I found continually that suspended decks were more prone to vibration compared to a solid deck with a high mass plinth.

You prefer the latter even though you think solid in a high mass plinth is less prone to vibration?  And are we talking vibration or the ability to make the thing shake if it is knocked or moved rather than isolating from air born vibrations?   Also personal view is for best isolation mount the turntable on a shelf on a solid wall .. regardless of solid or suspended.  

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3 minutes ago, uzzy said:

per Wiki .. 

The SL-10 was the first linear-tracking turntable to feature direct drive, a Technics innovation dating back to 1969 with the SP-10 Mk I. The SL-10, along with its fully programmable stablemate the SL-15, was able to penetrate the consumer electronics market much more effectively than any preceding linear-tracking turntable, and it spawned a wave of imitators throughout the 1980s, along with many derivations by Technics itself.

Unlike many of the inexpensive designs that followed it, the SL-10 is cast from aluminum and weighs 6.5 kg. Its chassis is the same size as a standard LP jacket, doing away with the large plinth, visible tonearm and general bulk associated with conventional radial-tracking turntables that the public was familiar with up to that point.

The SL-10 came equipped with the Technics EPS-310MC moving-coil cartridge. Due to the low output of the moving-coil cartridge, the SL-10 includes a built-in, bypassable step-up preamp to allow it to connect to standard phono inputs. The original Technics EPS-310MC moving-coil cartridge was designed to be replaced as a unit; the stylus was not removable. The cartridge has since been discontinued; the SL-10 will accept any P-mount/T4P cartridge. The SL-10 is capable of being powered by an external DC power adapter or a standard AC power supply. The motor is quartz-locked, providing accurate rotational speed.

Perhaps the SL-10's most unusual feature is its ability to play records in any position, even vertical. With the lid closed, the SL-10's internal disc clamp holds the record in place, and the tonearm, being dynamically balanced, maintains a consistent tracking force regardless of the turntable position.

An example of the SL-10 is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.[1]

Specifications[edit]

Platter Type: 300mm diameter die-cast aluminium[2]
Speed Accuracy: +/- 0.002%
Wow and Flutter: 0.025%
Rumble: -78 dB
Tonearm Type: Dynamic balanced linear tracking gimbal suspension
Effective Tonearm Length: 105mm
Original Cartridge: EPC-310MC
Cartridge Frequency Response: 10 to 60,000 Hz
Dimensions: 315 x 88 x 315mm
Weight: 6.5kg

You prefer the latter even though you think solid in a high mass plinth is less prone to vibration?  And are we talking vibration or the ability to make the thing shake if it is knocked or moved rather than isolating from air born vibrations?   Also personal view is for best isolation mount the turntable on a shelf on a solid wall .. regardless of solid or suspended.  

Good observation!

I meant that I definitely preferred high mass and solid.

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2 hours ago, oldius said:

Good observation!

I meant that I definitely preferred high mass and solid.

I like high mass, solid and suspended :) .. I thought all men preferred suspenders :x

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Super Wammer

I had an SL-15 which was hopelesslyu unreliable, the arm would return to base part way through an LP for no apparent reason. I ended up chucking it in a skip.

However solid and heavy a TT it still picks up LF vibration and adds it to the cartridge output. Nice if you like a bit of added bass.

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On 16/02/2017 at 21:13, lordmortlock said:

I've always had a soft spot for this lovely looking TT. Are they actually any good? I know the posh original MC cart is a) superb and b) essentially unobtainium at sensible prices ... what other carts are considered at the top of the pmount tree?

Thanks for any help friends

Hi,

To answer your question, yes they are good, very very good especially when using the EPC310mc.

I used mine for about 6 years alongside a Thorens 124 and a Linn LP12/Ittok and I can honestly say there wasn't that much in it sound wise .

Due to downsizing I sold it about 3 years ago followed by the LP12, keeping the Thorens, which for me is a more flexible option.

What I didn't do was sell the fabulous EPC310, no I sent it up to J7 for a clean and appraisal (response was fair condition but some life in it yet). I was rather hoping I might pick up another SL10 at some stage but it seems unlikely, time flies when you're a fogey.

Why am I telling you this? Well if you happen to pick up a nice SL10 I could be persuaded into parting with the EPC310mc and I'll not be asking anything like the £570 that chap is currently trying to achieve on Ebay.

Good luck with your search, it's well worth the effort.

Cheers.....Dave

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If you don't go for the technics t4p mc option, there is an ortofon and audio technica range of p mounts still available. William Thakker from Germany has them online. You can always buy an ortofon omp10 cheaply second hand online and upgrade the stylus to a brand new 30 or 40 which are very good indeed. 

Edited by fletchdirect

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Thanks chaps. I have a pretty smart deck already and this would be an experiment to see if something easy to use (for friends and fam) could also be enjoyable. Bit of a New Years resolution to  make the system more inclusive, so thought this could do the job. 

I note that the deck originally sold with black paper 7" and 12" cutouts. Do you need these to play?

Edited by lordmortlock

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Super Wammer

I bought a 2nd hand SL10 some years ago. It didn't come with the cut outs you mention. My understanding is that if you have semi transluscent vinyl then the automatic cueing which depends on lights shining thro the platter, won't work as the lights shine thro the record. The opaque cutouts restores the cueing system. If you only play black vinyl or non see thro vinyl you won't have a problem

Edited by paularcher
added info

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