liffy99

Code of Practice for Scalford

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After my second visit I wonder whether there are things to make the event more informative / accessible and enjoyable ? So I have thrown together some thoughts that might improve the experience for both visitors and exhibitors;

EXHIBITORS

OK, we are not all Steve Jobs copies, and probably not used to talking in public etc but maybe there here are some suggestions that might make things a little easier all round.

1) Don't succumb to the feeling that music needs to be played continuously. Leave a minute or two between tracks so you can;

2) Tell people about the music you are playing and the equipment it is playing through (you will need to repeat this as the day passes to reflect the ever changing audience)

3) Take a breather yourself and perhaps make any system tweaks you need to

4) Listen to, and try to answer, questions - many will be of interest to others so can save you time repeating the same responses over the day

5) Watch the volume - high sound levels are OK in short bursts perhaps but can mask dynamics. Can also exacerbate existing room problems. Not to mention protecting our mostly middle-aged failing lugholes !

6) Don't put chairs too close to doors - try and keep the entry / exit reasonably clear

7) Write clear details of equipment on the doors and in the rooms (write clearly, legibly etc - 12pt text does not work well in a dark corridor). Consider placing "Now Playing" cards on the equipment in use at any time (sometimes it is difficult to tell which set of 'speakers are actually in use)

VISITORS

1) Don't stand in the doorway. If you are coming in, come in and let others come and go

2) STOP TALKING during playback. People are here to listen to the music, not to you.

3) Try not to hog the demo with lots of your own music. Several others may also want selections played so listening to very long or multiple tracks can be a little selfish.

Finally I wonder if there is a leaf to be taken from the Hi Fi shows of old in organising 20-30 min 'sessions'. I remember these to be really good where the demonstrator would spend 5 mins introducing the gear and music, play selections and system changes and then discuss at the end. Takes a lot or pressure off, gives everyone a chance and a better chance to listen properly.

Hmmm - what do you think ???

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Super Wammer

I think people run the rooms the way they want to run the rooms, and that's part of the charm of Scalford.

One person's "quick chat about a system" is another person's "stop yabbering and play the music", as an example.

Some of your points (e.g. don't stand in doorways) are kind of common sense though, trouble is, there's not always that much of it about :)

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Super Mod
After my second visit I wonder whether there are things to make the event more informative / accessible and enjoyable ? So I have thrown together some thoughts that might improve the experience for both visitors and exhibitors;

EXHIBITORS

OK, we are not all Steve Jobs copies, and probably not used to talking in public etc but maybe there here are some suggestions that might make things a little easier all round.

1) Don't succumb to the feeling that music needs to be played continuously. Leave a minute or two between tracks so you can;

2) Tell people about the music you are playing and the equipment it is playing through (you will need to repeat this as the day passes to reflect the ever changing audience)

3) Take a breather yourself and perhaps make any system tweaks you need to

4) Listen to, and try to answer, questions - many will be of interest to others so can save you time repeating the same responses over the day

5) Watch the volume - high sound levels are OK in short bursts perhaps but can mask dynamics. Can also exacerbate existing room problems. Not to mention protecting our mostly middle-aged failing lugholes !

6) Don't put chairs too close to doors - try and keep the entry / exit reasonably clear

7) Write clear details of equipment on the doors and in the rooms (write clearly, legibly etc - 12pt text does not work well in a dark corridor). Consider placing "Now Playing" cards on the equipment in use at any time (sometimes it is difficult to tell which set of 'speakers are actually in use)

VISITORS

1) Don't stand in the doorway. If you are coming in, come in and let others come and go

2) STOP TALKING during playback. People are here to listen to the music, not to you.

3) Try not to hog the demo with lots of your own music. Several others may also want selections played so listening to very long or multiple tracks can be a little selfish.

Finally I wonder if there is a leaf to be taken from the Hi Fi shows of old in organising 20-30 min 'sessions'. I remember these to be really good where the demonstrator would spend 5 mins introducing the gear and music, play selections and system changes and then discuss at the end. Takes a lot or pressure off, gives everyone a chance and a better chance to listen properly.

Hmmm - what do you think ???

As this isnt the Pub Car Park, I cant really reply in the way I would like to.

:clout:

Try exhibiting.

Then come back with your errrr "constructive" criticisms.

Right now I reaching for more Ibuprofen for the back I pulled moving 40kg Quad 2905s.

And a large espresso to make up for sleep deprivation.

:rant:

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Super Wammer

One year, I tried doing some 'chat' about the kit and what it was doing, and pretty much all I got was complaints that they didn't come for a lecture, and I should shut up and play some tunes. Of course they were much more polite than that, but that was the message.

So in later years, I just played some tunes.

People are constantly walking in and walking out, so any form of 'structured' event, 20-30 minute sessions or whatever, are pointless. With 50 rooms and 7 hours, that gives visitors an average of 8 minutes a room if they want to visit everything and not buy records, eat, drink or wee. (I've allowed 24 seconds to get between rooms)

Asking visitors if they have a CDs or LPs they'd like played is fun, as it finds new music, some of course will be dire, (beauty is in the mind etc etc) but many aren't.

As to talking whilst playing music, that's inevitable as visitors have questions and don't have the time to wait until the track's over, old friends meet, etc etc. Just live with it. It's only a stereo!

Scalford is BLOODY hard work for the exhibitors, but worth it, or we wouldn't all keep coming back and doing it again and again. Mind you, 40Kg 'speakers from the first or even second floor is no joke.

S.

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Super Wammer

Yes shame its not the car park.....

My polite reply.....as a regular visitor we don't need rules, guidance.....they stifle spontaneity.......live and let live...it is what makes Scalford, Scalford........

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Super Wammer
After my second visit I wonder whether there are things to make the event more informative / accessible and enjoyable ? So I have thrown together some thoughts that might improve the experience for both visitors and exhibitors;

EXHIBITORS

OK, we are not all Steve Jobs copies, and probably not used to talking in public etc but maybe there here are some suggestions that might make things a little easier all round.

1) Don't succumb to the feeling that music needs to be played continuously. Leave a minute or two between tracks so you can;

2) Tell people about the music you are playing and the equipment it is playing through (you will need to repeat this as the day passes to reflect the ever changing audience)

3) Take a breather yourself and perhaps make any system tweaks you need to

4) Listen to, and try to answer, questions - many will be of interest to others so can save you time repeating the same responses over the day

5) Watch the volume - high sound levels are OK in short bursts perhaps but can mask dynamics. Can also exacerbate existing room problems. Not to mention protecting our mostly middle-aged failing lugholes !

6) Don't put chairs too close to doors - try and keep the entry / exit reasonably clear

7) Write clear details of equipment on the doors and in the rooms (write clearly, legibly etc - 12pt text does not work well in a dark corridor). Consider placing "Now Playing" cards on the equipment in use at any time (sometimes it is difficult to tell which set of 'speakers are actually in use)

VISITORS

1) Don't stand in the doorway. If you are coming in, come in and let others come and go

2) STOP TALKING during playback. People are here to listen to the music, not to you.

3) Try not to hog the demo with lots of your own music. Several others may also want selections played so listening to very long or multiple tracks can be a little selfish.

Finally I wonder if there is a leaf to be taken from the Hi Fi shows of old in organising 20-30 min 'sessions'. I remember these to be really good where the demonstrator would spend 5 mins introducing the gear and music, play selections and system changes and then discuss at the end. Takes a lot or pressure off, gives everyone a chance and a better chance to listen properly.

Hmmm - what do you think ???

I think your post was supposed to be constructive but the timing probably all wrong. All the Organisers and Exhibitors are probably still recovering after an enjoyable but busy weekend so I think your comments could be seen to be a bit too soon.

Scalford works as the venue adds to the 'charm' of the event, sort of sums up the feel fo the wigwam community with a HUGE variety of members, systems and there is always something interesting round the corner.

Less is more, comments are welcome but probably not the day after :^

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It's an imperfect event with a lot of perfectionists walking around. I think Serge and Simon hit the nail on the head.

As for common sense matters and courtesy, a public show brings in the public as well as the forum and I saw a very broad cross section of society at my first Scalford.

I thought it rocked!

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One year, I tried doing some 'chat' about the kit and what it was doing, and pretty much all I got was complaints that they didn't come for a lecture, and I should shut up and play some tunes. Of course they were much more polite than that, but that was the message.

So in later years, I just played some tunes.

People are constantly walking in and walking out, so any form of 'structured' event, 20-30 minute sessions or whatever, are pointless. With 50 rooms and 7 hours, that gives visitors an average of 8 minutes a room if they want to visit everything and not buy records, eat, drink or wee. (I've allowed 24 seconds to get between rooms)

Asking visitors if they have a CDs or LPs they'd like played is fun, as it finds new music, some of course will be dire, (beauty is in the mind etc etc) but many aren't.

As to talking whilst playing music, that's inevitable as visitors have questions and don't have the time to wait until the track's over, old friends meet, etc etc. Just live with it. It's only a stereo!

Scalford is BLOODY hard work for the exhibitors, but worth it, or we wouldn't all keep coming back and doing it again and again. Mind you, 40Kg 'speakers from the first or even second floor is no joke.

S.

Another good post. And judging from the sounds emanating from your system Serge, I might have to start believing some of your views.... the horror!!

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I think your post was supposed to be constructive but the timing probably all wrong. All the Organisers and Exhibitors are probably still recovering after an enjoyable but busy weekend so I think your comments could be seen to be a bit too soon.

Scalford works as the venue adds to the 'charm' of the event, sort of sums up the feel fo the wigwam community with a HUGE variety of members, systems and there is always something interesting round the corner.

Less is more, comments are welcome but probably not the day after :^

Very :goodone:

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I recall one commercial show I went to - went into the Russ Andrews dem room (full system, not accessories).

Russ was in mid chat, no music.

Several minutes later, Russ was still talking, no music.

I piped up "This is all very interesting, but when are we going to hear the system and some music?"

RA smiled.

Or at least, he bared his teeth.

Music soon ensued.

I've demmed at all but 1 Scalford.

Just play the choons, ask at the end of each track if anyone has any preferences or discs of their own.

Play the next choon.

Chat with anyone 1-to-1 who wants to chat, but do it quietly.

Sorted.

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Protocol or just courtesy ?

The " social" is very important

Equally so is the music.

I have an opinion about "talking in competition with the music " in a full room

i was demoing and on hearing the chat turned the volume to zero mid tune.

The chat continued .

There was a corridor available.

Personally im a dedicated 60s rebel /rule breaker and not keen to further "organise" Scalford ( unless driven by actual exhibitors) but ----there's a time and place .

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