tuga

Wammer
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About tuga

  • Rank
    European

Personal Info

  • Location
    Oxfordshire, UK
  • Real Name
    Ric

Wigwam Info

  • Digital Source 1
    HQPlayer/MacBookPro
  • Digital Source 2
    NAA/CuBox-i
  • DAC
    Teac UD-501 (DSD128)
  • Integrated Amp
    Bespoke transistor
  • My Speakers
    Stirling LS3/6
  • Trade Status
    I am not in the Hi-Fi trade

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  1. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    As far as I know boundary reinforcement only affects the bass and is not without downsides. And if you look at the pseudo-anechoic response you can see that the bass is down by some 4-6dB below 100Hz anyway and that the 240Hz peak is an artifact: Audio Note AN-E Lexus Signature, anechoic response on tweeter axis at 50", averaged across 30° horizontal window and corrected for microphone response, with the complex sum of the nearfield woofer and port responses. Read more at https://www.stereophile.com/content/audio-note-e-lexus-signature-loudspeaker-measurements
  2. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    Corner-loading doesn't seem to make much of a difference in Dudley's room, the sub-200Hz response is equally awful: Harbeth M40.1, spatially averaged in-room response in AD's room (red trace); Audio Note AN-E/SPe HE, spatially averaged in-room response in AD's room (blue). Read more at https://www.stereophile.com/content/audio-note-e-lexus-signature-loudspeaker-john-atkinson-november-2008
  3. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    I'd love to hear them one day. I guess that it's just as easy to get carried away with measurements as it is with listening impressions. I'm sure that if the "harshness" you identified was indeed caused by the DAC and not the DAC highlighting problems somewhere else up or down the chain then it shouldn't be impossible to pick up with measurements. "Harshness" is probably the most offensive criminal in the audio world so I can perfectly understand your feelings of repulse. I will say again that I believe measurements and listening complementary and equally indispensable.
  4. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    You are assuming that excitement and accuracy are not related. That is the opposite of my experience.
  5. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    Only Boris gets to be called by his first name...
  6. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    I could be wrong here but I am convinced that the assumptions in bold are probably incorrect. For one it is very likely that your LV reference system may produce a bit of audible 2nd and 3rd order harmonic distortion and some IMD since they go hand in hand but it is probably excellent in many other aspects of performance, particularly when it comes to speaker-generated distortion. Yet one mustn't ignore the the question of "preference", a "presentation" bias which we've built over years, listening habits (some bad) that are often hard to break... And finally there's the question of adequate partnership: unlike AN-Es the Olympians have the correct sensitivity for being driven by flea-powered SETs.
  7. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    I'd seen this webpage. It could be a good starting point to our discussion: The aim of any technique used to cure Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) in hi-fi equipment is to prevent the unwanted radio frequency signal from reaching a point where it can cause other problems. There are three basic techniques for curing RFI problems: Earthing Shielding Filtering. A combination of these techniques may be necessary. Which objective diagnostic tools can we use to complement and/or verify our listening assessment? What are the probable causes? What is the best way to address each one of them? What are the downsides, if any, to curing RFI problems?
  8. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    I think that one should make a distinction between "best" and "preferred" sound. I guess we could say that the universal goal of high-fidelity is to reproduce the signal with as little distortion as possible ("best" sound) whilst the personal goal for a music reproduction system is whatever floats one's boat ("preferred" sound). And I agree with @steve 57 that understanding what improves the performance of a hi-fi system is crucial if you wish to achive the "best" sound. Which you may or may not "prefer", depending on many factors.
  9. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    I agree about the importance of transient response but there are several other aspects of sound reproduction which are just as important. And there's the subject of using suitable speakers; Dudley listened to the Jinro with AN-Es (estimated sensitivity of 92.5dB) and Quad ESLs... Atkinson: The power delivery at 1% THD is low: 8W into 16 ohms, 3.1W into 8 ohms, 1W into 4 ohms, and just 300mW into 2 ohms. Relaxing the definition of clipping to 3% THD gives powers of 12W into 16 ohms, 17.7W into 8 ohms, 5.1W into 4 ohms In my experience the most natural/realistic-sounding system is one which produces as little distortion of any type as possible, which is far from what I've listened to at AN demos.
  10. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    Interesting that you've picked up that sentence. At some point I was thinking of highlighting how absolutely nonsensical it is...might as well. What does he mean by solo voices and instruments to stand musically and spatially proud of the rest of the mix? They are the mix... Cow dung. Dudley obviously doesn't care about tonal balance nor hearing bucketloads of THD and IMD nor poor S/N nor high channel bleeding judging by his equipment preferences and the response of speakers in his room: Harbeth M40.1, spatially averaged in-room responses in JA's room (blue trace) and AD's room (red), taken under identical circumstances. Read more at https://www.stereophile.com/content/harbeth-m401-loudspeaker-ja-november-2008
  11. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    I was replying to George who said "Magazines are businesses and when all of them have done customer surveys the thing people want and will pay for are reviews, reviews and reviews." You may have missed this: "perhaps they should be objectively addressing some of technical aspects of the hobby as well". I think that graphs/images are an invaluable form of illustrating a point but I understand that some people hate them. We humans do that with things we don't understand or which question our beliefs... . P.S.: numbers are measurements by the way.
  12. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    Well, judging from the questions we get here perhaps they should be objectively addressing some of technical aspects of the hobby as well (but I am wishfully thinking that they have the required competences)... These are all recently started topics: •Does rfi makes a system sound brighter? •This is a stupid question: What's the difference between powered speakers and active? •Please educate me on crossover slopes •Adding mass to CDs •Cartridge run in •Pre-amps: input and output impedance •Record cleaners •Treating Room Nodes with bass traps etc and the mother of all questions: •Measurements - do they really matter that much ? . P.S.: Is it also profitable to keep the consumer ignorant I wonder? (in a minute someone will defend that audio is just a fun hobby anyway)
  13. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    BoJo the Clown?
  14. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    He loves it, so what? Reviews are pointless unless they describe sound from an observationist perspective; there's no use in knowing whether or not someone's like something. We're all different, have different tastes and goals and requirements... . P.S. Dudley has one of the worst rooms I've seen measurements of...
  15. tuga

    Does rfi makes a system sound brighter?

    They're also produce quite notable IMD. This is the Audio Note Jinro: Audio Note Jinro, volume control at maximum, frequency response at 1V into: simulated loudspeaker load (gray). The output impedance from the single transformer tap was commendably low for a single-ended-triode design, at 2.5 ohms, which resulted in frequency-response variations of +1.6dB/–1.2dB into our standard simulated loudspeaker (fig.1, gray trace). . The unweighted, wideband S/N ratio (ref. 1W into 8 ohms, with the input shorted by the volume control set to its maximum) was 44.6dB left and 61.7dB right. These figures improved to 58.7 and 79.9dB, respectively, when A-weighted. . Audio Note Jinro, distortion (%) vs 1kHz continuous output power into (from bottom to top): 16, 8, 4, 2 ohms. The actual distortion was below the noise at powers below 100mW into 16 and 8 ohms, but the linear rise with THD above that level suggests that Jinro uses very little global negative feedback, or even none at all. As a result, the amplifier's distortion reaches 1%, our usual definition of clipping, long before symmetrical waveform clipping occurs. The power delivery at 1% THD is low: 8W into 16 ohms, 3.1W into 8 ohms, 1W into 4 ohms, and just 300mW into 2 ohms. Relaxing the definition of clipping to 3% THD gives powers of 12W into 16 ohms, 17.7W into 8 ohms, 5.1W into 4 ohms, and just 2.3W into 2 ohms, which suggests that Audio Note's specification of 18Wpc into 8 ohms at 5% THD (12.55dBW) is correct. . Audio Note Jinro, THD+N (%) vs frequency at 1V into: 16 ohms (left channel gray), 8 ohms (left blue, right red), 4 ohms (left cyan, right magenta), 2 ohms (left green). . Audio Note Jinro, spectrum of 50Hz sinewave, DC–1kHz, at 1W into 8 ohms (left channel blue, right red; linear frequency scale). . Audio Note Jinro, HF intermodulation spectrum, DC–24kHz, 19+20kHz at 5W peak into 8 ohms (linear frequency scale). The power-supply–related spuriae dominate the noise floor with the high-frequency intermodulation test (fig.9). However, while the Jinro's "bent" transfer function gives rise to a 1kHz difference product at just –36dB (1.5%, left) and –40dB (1%, right), other intermodulation products are relatively moderate in level. Note, though, that while the power level at which I took this measurement was well within the Jinro's capability, the primary tones have sidebands present at ±60 and ±120Hz, which suggests that the amplifier is starting to run out of steam. Read more at https://www.stereophile.com/content/audio-note-jinro-integrated-amplifier-measurements