Vinyl Art

Workshop Shavings

518 posts in this topic

The aim of this thread, hopefully soon to be a Blog, is to take a look inside the workshop and and give some details of the projects going through there. Plenty of pictures and maybe the occasional short film.

My opportunity to show you what I love doing and along the way share some knowledge and hopefully learn something new as well.

I thought I would kick off with my latest project, based on some upcycled timber. A while back, Doug of this parish offered up some old mahogany that had been used in the roof trusses of his conservatory. I wouldn't normally use tropical timber as I am not yet persuaded by the sustainability claims, but re-using old timber makes perfect sense.

Any road up, I was on a bit of a round robin trip this weekend, delivering a plinth, a rack, taking in the European Woodwork Show and meeting some great Wammers on route. On the way back up North i stopped off at Doug and Lisa's and picked up the mahogany, Brazilian none the less.

Got it home and just couldn't resist the temptation to make a start. First project with this will be a frame for a 4 shelf rack and I have decided to do this using hand tools only. It'll take a while, but a nice filler in and around the other jobs.

Well this is how it looked to start with, about 6" x 2" and 6' to 8' long. Painted, with various nails, screws, sealant and inset seals in abundance.

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

A quick peek under the paint.

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

and then off with the moulding

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

remove the seals from their machined recesses

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

and then saw off a 20mm thick strip (44mm high). I will need four of these for the cross rails.

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

and why the fuss about Brazilian mahogany?

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

Enough said, glorious figuring, colour and grain. Don't even get me started about the smell:love:

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Fanny Thatch could be a logical choice of name fer this 'un Bob.:D

Great piccies & always nice to get a further glimpse into your craftmanship & passion for what you love doing. Seriously I'm in awe of all your work I've seen on here:notworthy: think it's a great idea fer a thread cum blog too.:^

Any news on the H/Shell project you mentioned a while back, re the option of offering w. azimuth adjustment as well as a fixed version?

ATB

C.

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Some new chisels are needed in the shop, namely mortice chisels. I've promised myself for a long time now that the next set of chisels i would buy would be Japanese. There is something about the craftsmanship that goes into these chisels along with their unbeatable ability to maintain a sharp edge that attracts me.

A tad pricey perhaps, but if you avoid the "in vogue" brands and head for a master blacksmith who has a good reputation there are some fantastic chisels to be had at reasonable prices.

In terms of steel, then blue or white paper steels (colour of label) are the main choices. Then either plane or decorated (etched with Damascus type pattern). White steel tends to keep it's edge longer but blue can take a finer edge. For mortice chisels white steel would seem the best choice and nicely avoids the premium for blue steel.

The craft of taking iron and folding it in a smiths forge is not new. Roman and English blacksmiths were doing this over the last 2000 years to make swords. they didn't understand the metallurgy, but they knew if they beat the material often and folded it to expose new material then they would end up with good iron, or steel as we call it today. The forging process effectively removed the graphite (carbon) impurities and if they got it right they ended up with 1 to 2% carbon steel. As we industrialised the process and understood the metallurgy we lost the craft, the Japanese didn't.

They built on their knowledge and now forge weld the tool steel to a softer iron backer that helps absorb the shock of the hammer blows and protects the cutting edge. The cutting edge steel is also hardened to beyond that of most western type chisels.

A pair of Mukoumachi Nomi (mortice chisels) are now winging their way to me, Master Matsumura having worked his magic on them.

If you look closely in the first picture you can see the welded join line between the tool white steel and the softer backer.

mukoumachinomi309540.jpg

mukoumachinomi309540c.jpg

here's the fella, loving the leaf spring forge.

japan05-067.jpg

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Hi Bob, Great to see the wood taking shape, the grain looks spectacular. Your comments about the Japanese chisels has set me thinking about getting some replacement ones.

Have you tried the Japaneses saws, I was very pleased when I got some from Axminster Tools

http://www.axminster.co.uk/ice-bear-japanese-dozuki-me-tenon-saw-prod19709/

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Not tried the saws yet Doug. Different technique to learn on them as they cut on the pull. Not long bought some Pax dovetail and tenon saws, so probably stick with them for now. In the future maybe, you never know and I wouldn't rule them out.

My chisels are currently at an airport in Germany, due in Monday:D

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Brilliant................as expected

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interesting stuff bob, will keep a watch on this thread :D

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Moderator

Have you ever thought about running paid "Woodworking classes for beginners" type workshops Bob ?

Could be a Bob or two in it :D

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Those chisels look wonderful. I use Japanese cooks knives and if the chisels are as well made then you'll have hours of fun. Right tool for the job. It makes such a difference, whatever sphere in life.

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Bob, I love this. As someone who originally trained in craft, design and furniture, and in my very early career taught woodwork in schools (when it was still woodwork), it makes me smile to read your posts and see images of your work. My only disappointment (with myself) is although I have most of the handtools (kept in a reasonable condition) and alot of handheld machine tools, I don't have the bench space or the time to do more. I have to say I am getting more an more tempted to build and experiment with a really nicely made pair of open baffle speakers.......

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Thanks for the kind comments guys, once Dom has sorted the Blog function out i will still be more than happy to chat via PM as the blog function doesn't have a comments section.

Another Hush platform on its way out of the shop. This time a unit in Cherry but stained with a black stain/varnish combo and finished with a few coats of acrylic varnish. Fitted with Soundcare Superspikes from Purite North, the chrome uprights on the feet look great against the black frame. This is a split top special, designed for a Teddy Pardo power supply and Naim Unitiserve unit.

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DSCF1213.jpg by BobC44, on Flickr

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DSCF1205.jpg by BobC44, on Flickr

PS, Simon, go for it, the worst that can happen is that you enjoy yourself:D

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The Vikings 'invented' nitriding to harden their swords even more. New swords were buried in chicken poo for up to a year, the high ammonia content (NH3) of the poo slowly hardening the folded metal. Nowadays is done quickly in a heated gas filled chamber, but makes cast steel very hard.

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I'm fresh out of Viking chicken:D Reminds me of that story of the BMW guys being asked to urinate over used engine block castings (for a year they were left round back of the factory) that came from the 2000TI cars prior to them being worked on for the F1 cars of the day. Probably an urban legend.

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All 4 stretchers now cut out and rough planed, first of the 4 rails also done, just the remaining 3 of these and 4 styles to go.

10006873896_355a55ab2f_z.jpg

Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

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Untitled by BobC44, on Flickr

The saw I have been using for these is just a Stanley Fatmax rip cut saw, designed for going down the grain. Great saws and better than the traditional pattern saws of old, by a country mile. Cheap as chips relatively speaking, about £15 versus £100. Save yourself some money here, not all modern tools are inferior.

The rip cut saws work like a multitude of small chisels, each point lifting off small pieces of wood, they cut in straight lines parallel to the grain without drifting off. The cross cut saws are designed to cut across the grain and each tooth is shaped and splayed out allowing the grain to be cut.

To confuse matters more, some saw types are available in either cross or rip cut patterns, such as Tenon saws. Dovetails saws tend to be rip cut, but can be bought cross cut.

I have a cross cut Tenon saw and a rip cut Dovetail saw. My next tenon saw will have a much deeper blade (5" as opposed to 3") and be rip cut, it will be primarily used for rip cutting down the sides of longer tenons. The Dovetail saw will suffice for smaller Tenons, being only 2.5" blade depth.

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