Guest

Oiling a Garrard 401.

7 posts in this topic

It has been about 6 or 7 years since my deck was serviced so I would imagine it would be a good idea to top up the oil levels. What parts need oiling/greasing and what type of oils get reccomended?

Cheers

:^

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dom

the following parts need oiling:

Spindle bearing and shaft;

Motor top bearing;

motor base bearing.

The spindle is easy enough. If it's not been done in a while, best to removed and clean it and the housing just to check for wear. You may need to replace the bottom spindle gasket. A few nuts and bolts to remove and the spindle is easy enough to remove. Check the base bearing (phosphor bronze thrust pad) for wear. It should be like a hemisphere but with wear, the top flattens off. A little flattening is ok although the more there is, the more noise and friction there'll also be. You can replace these with softer bronze ball bearing kits providing the correct oil is used.

It used to be common practice just to use sewing machine or light machine oil but (especially with ball bearings) you are better using a synthetic motor oil such as a 0W20 or 0W30 oil, 5W30 is ok too (something like Mobile 1...just put the rest in your car!). There's a fair bit of pressure on a ball bearing and synthetic long chain polymer oils provide better bearing protection so I'm told even at low rotational speeds.

The same grade oil can be used for the motor bearings as I've found over the years that machine oil is too light and tends to evaporate out with heat and use.

Best to remove the motor to take apart the clam shell to get to the bottom bearing and just top up the well with some synthetic as above. Sit the rotor and shaft back into place, invert and oil the top, via the top felt washer (oil will make its way down the shaft).

If you don't want to remove the motor, you can just turn the deck upside down, carefully remove the mounting springs and base clamp, and using long nosed pliers carefully undo the two nuts holding the clam shells together, then drop out the base clam shell, oiling as above, and taking the opportunity to inspect the shaft ends for wear. Carefully replace the shaft and align properly (the base is a spherical bearing housing that moves or should do to facilitate correct shaft alignment). Get this wrong and you'll increase noise, heat and wear. It may need to be worked lose and oiled. Oil the top via the holes in the rotor disc from the top when the deck is turned the right way up. You can do this by placing a straw into some oil, covering the top with your thumb, then feeding the base through one of the three rotor holes and releasing your thumb to let gravity do its job. It may get a bit messy. I must admit for this bearing I find it easier to just use light machine oil sprayed in from a can with one of those thing plastic tube feeds.

Be careful when handling the linkages underneath as they are Cadmium coated and therefore toxic! There are several places which will strip the Cadmium off and galvanise instead. The linkages need light greasing at several points. I just use LM grease for this, it's fine.

That's the basics done. Fiddly but well within DIY capabilities.

I did a DIY article a while back with photos if that would help:

http://www.hifiwigwam.com/showthread.php?71336-Garrard-401-strip-down-service-and-new-plinth-build&highlight=garrard+401

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent thank you for that, have been away, but will give this a go after I move in a weeks time. Will update :^

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is worth replacing the felts (one at the top of the spindle and top and bottom of the motor - The motor felts are often varnished and limited in their ability to adequately lubricate the motor bearings) The oil retaining felt washer on the top of the spindle housing is critical as it is the only means of oiling the top bush of the spindle housing. This felt should be kept sufficiently lubricated at all times..(If it's dry to the touch it needs oil)

IMG_8338.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good points there. The top of the motor felt bushing in particular on most original ones has probably hardly (if ever) been oiled by owners as its a swine to get to, so well worth paying particular attention to this one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Great post and photos!

Just wondered if you had tried any of the engine oils you mention such as Mobil 1 as I notice in your thread that you actually used light machine oil?

I have a 401 which is transmitting to much rumble from the motor. I have re-oiled the motor once with sewing machine oil but no difference (I may not have put enough in mind you)

The deck is solidly mounted to a oak topped birch ply plinth.

Funnily enough I was toying with using sorbothane hemispheres so I guess great minds and all that! Does the 'shore hardness' make a big difference as I have some large hemishpheres but do not know there hardness

Thanks

Mark

Dom

the following parts need oiling:

Spindle bearing and shaft;

Motor top bearing;

motor base bearing.

The spindle is easy enough. If it's not been done in a while, best to removed and clean it and the housing just to check for wear. You may need to replace the bottom spindle gasket. A few nuts and bolts to remove and the spindle is easy enough to remove. Check the base bearing (phosphor bronze thrust pad) for wear. It should be like a hemisphere but with wear, the top flattens off. A little flattening is ok although the more there is, the more noise and friction there'll also be. You can replace these with softer bronze ball bearing kits providing the correct oil is used.

It used to be common practice just to use sewing machine or light machine oil but (especially with ball bearings) you are better using a synthetic motor oil such as a 0W20 or 0W30 oil, 5W30 is ok too (something like Mobile 1...just put the rest in your car!). There's a fair bit of pressure on a ball bearing and synthetic long chain polymer oils provide better bearing protection so I'm told even at low rotational speeds.

The same grade oil can be used for the motor bearings as I've found over the years that machine oil is too light and tends to evaporate out with heat and use.

Best to remove the motor to take apart the clam shell to get to the bottom bearing and just top up the well with some synthetic as above. Sit the rotor and shaft back into place, invert and oil the top, via the top felt washer (oil will make its way down the shaft).

If you don't want to remove the motor, you can just turn the deck upside down, carefully remove the mounting springs and base clamp, and using long nosed pliers carefully undo the two nuts holding the clam shells together, then drop out the base clam shell, oiling as above, and taking the opportunity to inspect the shaft ends for wear. Carefully replace the shaft and align properly (the base is a spherical bearing housing that moves or should do to facilitate correct shaft alignment). Get this wrong and you'll increase noise, heat and wear. It may need to be worked lose and oiled. Oil the top via the holes in the rotor disc from the top when the deck is turned the right way up. You can do this by placing a straw into some oil, covering the top with your thumb, then feeding the base through one of the three rotor holes and releasing your thumb to let gravity do its job. It may get a bit messy. I must admit for this bearing I find it easier to just use light machine oil sprayed in from a can with one of those thing plastic tube feeds.

Be careful when handling the linkages underneath as they are Cadmium coated and therefore toxic! There are several places which will strip the Cadmium off and galvanise instead. The linkages need light greasing at several points. I just use LM grease for this, it's fine.

That's the basics done. Fiddly but well within DIY capabilities.

I did a DIY article a while back with photos if that would help:

http://www.hifiwigwam.com/showthread.php?71336-Garrard-401-strip-down-service-and-new-plinth-build&highlight=garrard+401

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd avoid sewing machine oil, its too thin and will be through the bearing in no time. I use 10/40, but clean fairly regularly.

I'm also an advocate of solid mounting, sorbothane (and squash balls) soften the drive and make the Garrard sound less Garrardy, if your happy with the sound , leave it alone.

The 301's linkages are Cadmium plated, not a problem with a 401, they're safe to handle.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.