JamPal

Which HDR software?

18 posts in this topic

Exposing 2 stops under was probably a great idea for bridge cameras of 5 years ago but the improvements in both sensor technology and processing power probably make that overly cautious.

If you underexpose then recover, you get dark tones being recovered to create mid-tones and the question then is one of detail. This article explains why having your exposure mid-to-light is better than dark-to-mid, as long a you don't blow the highlights.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/expose-right.shtml

One other thing to remember is that the histogram is based on the JPEG file (it will change slightly if you use different in-camera presets) and in my experience with Canon DLSRs shooting RAW has about one stop more latitude than the histogram shows. So blown-out highlight on the histogram may well be OK on RAW.

Good article that. Must get out and do some comparisons.:^

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I'm pretty new to photography, but read about 'shooting to the right' pretty early on. TBH I'm having mixed results with it, as it's easy to blow your highlights with to much +EV. If you're careful with your metering & use the AE-L button it can work very well after some PP to bring back the washed out looking image (not good to do if you shoot RAW+) . That said I don't see the point of using -EV all the time as you're throwing away detail, great though if you want an uderexposed effect or looking for a low-key type image.

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From what I've read (& perhaps I missed the point) you only loose detail through overexposure if you blow the highlights or underexposure if you block the blacks. So, any recorded pixel that has a value that's not pure white or black can be adjusted in your RAW developer. The big difference to all this is how the pixels are recorded by the camera sensor. It works effectively in stops so your brightest tones at the far right of the histogram can record 2048 levels, the next stop down can record 1024 levels, but by the time you get down to the darkest tones only 128 can be recorded. So it makes sense if you're trying to record as much detail as possible to overexpose a stop or two & record higher detail & then bring back the tones but with the extra detail now recorded.

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