Sheva

Moto GP

198 posts in this topic

Certainly Casey was off the pace somewhat. One wonders whether he's half-hung up his helmet already.

Hi,

A very significant point. It has allways been said that as soon as you start talking about retiring you have done it.

Rgds.

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Nahhh, from the look of some of the movement he had with the bike, I say chatter - pretty sure he'll want to end with another championship win

He most certainly would, Sam, but, as per rocker 65, having made the decision (and of course now having a young family and the natural desire to see them grow up and to be able to do things with them), one (this one anyway) wonders whether at least subconsciously there is the tendency to push less hard, to do the safe® thing rather than the risky/ier thing.

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I'm at the motogp now at silverstone, my first time live..... Done other motosport but this is exceptional.

The atmosphere electric and the excitement i felt as these rock stars of motosport were right in front of me.

Race was awesome and i have to do this again :) :) :thumbup:

Certainly your earlier comments about chatter on the Hondas was borne out today, Sam. Casey Stoner said as much in a post-race interview. The BBC camerawork was good - I've never before noticed seeing daylight under the rear wheel as these guys brake. Awesome ability.

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I've not heard the interviews (couldn't hear much - PA at Silverstone is rubbish) ...... so will look forward to watching it again once I get home. :cool:

- - - Updated - - -

Good recovery ride from Crutchlow. I'm no 2 wheeled expert but it seems to me his practice accident, and consequent grid position, ruined what could have been a safe podium position.

Not sure about 'safe' ..... he was riding with a broken and dislocated ankle. What he did was awesome, but to get on the podium he'd have had to pass Pedrosa or Stoner and also Bartista was racing very very well, so would have been hard to get by. I don't think even if he'd started sixth he'd have got on the podium - though would have been great to see.

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You can't compare the two directly ofc, since the manx is just man against clock, but for balls, the I.o.M has to be hard to beat for tarmac fun; but neither come close to the big off road races IMO, and the Paris Dakar riders are as hard as it gets.

On the age thing, I think I agree with 136 a little. Having ridden bikes from the 60's onwards, the modern supersports bike is SSOOOOOO much easier to ride. OK, it's 50mph faster, but so what, the skill is not in speed but in brakes and corners, and bikes from the 70's / 80's were pure evil to ride fast. It doesn't matter much and I'm cetainly not decrying the stoner skills, but I'd not put a penny on him against Roberts and co on their machinery, not a single penny.

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Well, I've watched the recorded one at home, and I have to say ..... I think he may have had a podium without his off ..... only 15 seconds behind the leaders, he perhaps would have passed Bartista and Pedrosa.

I am sure he'll get there. Just would have been incredible to do it on home soil. Wonder if he could take the 2nd Yam (factory bike) next year - or indeed be a contender for the Honda seat.

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Best race I've seen in ages. Although you can't visibly see the chatter they were all on about, it can be felt and you can do nothing about it when it happens except modify your lines and throttle action (from my own racing days). Ruins handling and takes a huge additional physical and mental drain to keep pushing, but the fact its coming in as a big consideration is no surprise given the track conditions and crazy lean angles these bikes are capable of . Crutchy rode the wheels of that bike and his 6th was astonishing given his last place start and injury. The guy must have been in agony next morning when the adrenalin and painkillers wore off...

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I have only just heard that Ducati has been acquired by Audi. Given Audi's recent triumph at Le Mans and, on the same day, all the Ducatis being beaten by a man who started from the back with a broken ankle, one wonders what sort of thinking will be going on in Ingoldstadt. Audi is used to success, and it's difficult to seem it tolerating failure for long.

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That's good news in many ways. I agree with paul about audi and lambo. They retained the character and ironed out the engineering it seems (not that I've ever been in or near one sadly).

The problem is only that the 800 V4 produces too MUCH power low down, and the power pulses form the engine are so huge, it upsets the handling and chassis. This is certainly a problem Ducati can solve for itself in the race team, tho Audi's resources will help!

For the road bikes, it has to be a good thing. I sold my Duke after two years. There was nothing wrong with the bike, but it broke my heart to watch it fall apart over winter, despite all my efforts to protect it. Rust, bad electrics, sloppy design touches all ruined a fantastic bike. If Audi sort all that, then I'll have another please.

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