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Gyro's back-of-a-fag-packet guide to getting your CDs into a file for streaming

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I know it's presumptious of me to post a how-to guide, but I'm getting bored of the same questions being asked, and the same mistakes being made.

Starting point: you've got a huge pile of CDs

Desired end point: some kind of digital streaming system, playing your tunes

I'm not going to go into playback hardware; PC, Mac, Squeezebox, Sonos, Linn DS, whatevs. In my opinion the only real way they differ is in their user interfaces and expansion capability. They're all digital systems, so the only thing that's going to make a significant difference to the sound is your choice of DAC.

What I'm actually after is your approach and choices regarding ripping your CDs to files, so you can play them on your new system. The overall aim is for you to rip once, and never again, rather than getting half-way through, discovering a problem, and starting over.

This is not an unbiased, equitable guide. I have opinions, and I'm going to spell them out.

Finally, I don't want this to go on for pages and pages - stop me if I get boring. So without further ado:

Lossless versus Lossy

Lossless music file formats are just that, lossless representations of the original CD. Exactly the same digital data as the original CD. Lossy formats sacrifice some data for smaller file size.

The most common lossy format is mp3. mp3 comes with different settings, measured in kilobits per second, the higher the kilobits, the more data, the closer to the original, but the larger the file.

You probably call yourself an audiophile, or at least you're interested in good sounds and music, that's why you're here. Do not use a lossy format. Use a lossless format. If you rip to a lossy format then information is gone for good; you can always transcode down from lossless to lossy for a given application, you can't go back up the way. I'll say that again: USE A LOSSLESS FORMAT.

Compressed versus uncompressed

On the assumption that we're using a lossless format, the three biggies in this arena are FLAC, ALAC and WAV. ALAC is owned by Apple, and is really only useful for Apple kit; namely Macs and iPods. There is also the Microsoft Proprietary WMA lossless, but support for this is severely limited so I'm going to discount it right now.

Lossy formats effectively compress the original data. BUT this does not mean that all compression is lossy. FLAC and ALAC are lossless, and compressed. WAV is lossless, and uncompressed full fat. The usual comparison made is to a Word document (the WAV file), and a zipped copy of that Word document (FLAC or ALAC). If you unzip the file all your words are still there. Compressed is different to lossy.

As we're all aware, disc space is very cheap. Resilient, managed space is less cheap, but still not going to break the bank. iPod space is limited and more expensive, so for your core system (assuming it's not an iPod) the compressed versus uncompressed debate is a red herring.

Tags / Metadata

Tags are chunks of information, embedded in your music files, that describe the file. Artist name, track name, track number, album art, all that good stuff.

FLAC and ALAC support tags.

WAV does not.

Nearly all music management programs maintain their own database of what is in files. So for instance Windows Media Player and MediaMonkey will be able to tell you what is in a particular untagged WAV file because you've told them. If your untagged WAV files become detached from the life-support-system of the player, say through a software malfunction, or you simply decide to change player software or hardware, then you've lost all context of what is in them. Tagged files carry data about themselves around with them, so it's simply a matter of telling the new player to go and scan your files, read in the information, and build up a new index.

You can see where I'm going with this.

USE A TAGGED FILE FORMAT. DO NOT USE WAV.

Software choices

I'm going to get this out of the way up front. You're desperate to start ripping, you've got a PC, Windows Media Player is already installed, so you're going to use it. DO NOT USE WMP - at least until you've understood the alternatives. For a start, WMP only supports WAV, WMA and mp3, and you will be sent to the naughty step if you rip to any of these.

The most commonly suggested ripping programs are

MediaMonkey

EAC

dbPoweramp

iTunes

The first three support FLAC, iTunes does ALAC.

My personal preference is for dbPoweramp - its lookup of metadata when you insert a new CD to rip is very good, and it effectively uses "crowdsourcing", comparing your rips with those of other users to ensure they're accurate. I'm sure others will chime in with details of their favourites.

Portable Devices

Let's face it; iPods.

iPods don't support FLAC. If you're in a homogeneous Apple world then you've ripped to ALAC, this will play in iTunes and on your iPod and all is cool.

If you have non-Apple kit, you've ripped to FLAC, which won't (without serious intervention) play on your iPod.

You'll need to transcode from FLAC to (usually) mp3. You can either maintain two libraries, one lossless, one in mp3, or some software such as MediaMonkey can transcode on the fly to synch with an iPod.

Conclusions

Use a lossless format.

Use a tagged format.

This leaves you with FLAC or ALAC.

Transcode to mp3 for your iPod if you're using FLAC

Personal Preferences

I rip with dbPoweramp, for reasons mentioned above.

I manage music with MediaMonkey - it makes bulk tag editing very easy, and has good transcoding abilities.

Flame on ...

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Awesome, rep added. I was thinking of doing something similar, but it wouldn't have been as good, or as lucid.

Might be worth giving AIFF a quick mention, as it's uncompressed and supports tags. Some of the paranoid Mac users like it.

I'm sure you're too modest to ask, so I will - Stickification, please mods! :)

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Nice one Gyro.

Just a bit daunting looking at 1000 cds and imagining all that time feeding them in and waiting for them to rip. Life is too short. I need to train a monkey.

Has noboby found a faster way? Are there no companies out there that rip quick for a fee?

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Top effort, rep added :^

I use a mix and match, why? I don't know, it just ended up that way.

I like the visuals of iTunes and how easy it is to edit tags and move things around, so all my music is ripped to ALAC and then for the ipod I just set the sync options to convert to 128 mp3 when I add music from the library, I can also control iTunes remotely with the ipod touch via the remote app which works a treat.

But it's on a windows PC and that's the end of the Apple trail.

I did use FLAC a squeezebox and ipeng previous but I couldn't get it to be reliable enough and it was getting a pain in the arse, so I binned it off, no doubt more IT savvy folks can get it running sweet as.

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Has noboby found a faster way? Are there no companies out there that rip quick for a fee?

Several. I think Keith @ Purite offers the service on his website. I'd do it for less though :P

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What an excellent post. :^

Allow me to add a link: Robin Bowes's excellent Perl script FLAC2MP3.

http://projects.robinbowes.com/flac2mp3/trac

What this does to take your FLAC library and duplicate it in MP3. Trivial, you might think, but there are a couple of sweet additions:

  1. It only does what needs to be done, so you just run it every so often to synchronise your FLAC and MP3 libraries
  2. It has a "tags only" mode, so if you update your FLAC tags, it updates just the tags on the MP3s

It is dead easy to set up in Linux, and there is a guide to doing it in Windows. While setup does take a bit of time, once it is done you just need to create a shortcut/batch file/whatever to run the same command every so often, so maintenance is zero. Very cool.

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Excellent guide and over the past week of asking fo advice i have ended up doing exactly what you recomend. I would heartily recomend mediamonkey as a replacement for i Tunes for those with I Pods. Now I have a windows phone I don't even have to put up with the hassle of a pod.:):):^:^

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It's not cheap....

http://www.pcpro.co.uk/realworld/362734/the-rapid-way-to-rip-a-cd-collection

Nice one Gyro.

Just a bit daunting looking at 1000 cds and imagining all that time feeding them in and waiting for them to rip. Life is too short. I need to train a monkey.

Has noboby found a faster way? Are there no companies out there that rip quick for a fee?

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Thanks Karl, that is a good article.

Ouch! It is certainly not cheap. Looks like it will be a long labour of love if I go that way.

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Moderator

Thanks for a great informative guide,i am looking to go down this road myself,and this guide is a big help,cheers!

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I'd also make another software recommendation for anyone wanting to get into this properly, a free tag management program called mp3tag http://www.mp3tag.de/en/

It's incredibly powerful, allowing batch tagging based on rules and queries. It also has a very useful right-click context menu action, so you can browse windows folders, and load up the tags from an album right there.

If you have file tags and your music management software isn't displaying the information as it should, mp3tag will help you get to the bottom of it, by highlighting conflicting tags applied to the file.

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