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Correct speaker plugs & narrower cable

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I crimp then solder. The tool should be fine.

Alan

Am I correct in thinking that I crimp the sleave within the large section and solder the wire in the narrower section (without crimping)?

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Super Wammer
Am I correct in thinking that I crimp the sleave within the large section and solder the wire in the narrower section (without crimping)?

Very difficult to do that without melting the insulation, in my experience...better solution is to solder and then use shrink sleeving to cover the last 10mm of the wire and the solder joint. The main point of the sleeving is to give a bit of strain relief to the joint so it is less likely to fracture over time. If you don't have any shrink sleeving, a good alternative is self-amalgamating rubber tape - often sold for use in tv aerial installation etc - for example: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Self-Amalgamating-Tape-rubber-sealing-Repair-Satalite-10m-Roll-car-Fusing-/291080876338?hash=item43c5c5b132:g:tc8AAOxydlFS~2du

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Very difficult to do that without melting the insulation, in my experience...better solution is to solder and then use shrink sleeving to cover the last 10mm of the wire and the solder joint. The main point of the sleeving is to give a bit of strain relief to the joint so it is less likely to fracture over time. If you don't have any shrink sleeving, a good alternative is self-amalgamating rubber tape - often sold for use in tv aerial installation etc - for example: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Self-Amalgamating-Tape-rubber-sealing-Repair-Satalite-10m-Roll-car-Fusing-/291080876338?hash=item43c5c5b132:g:tc8AAOxydlFS~2du

Hi Tony. Thanks for explaining. I don't wish to make what I assume should be a simple job, but I do need to ask questions which might have very obvious answers. Ok so I solder the wires within the narrowest crimpable section but not crimp the larger crimpable section around the sleave but instead use the electrical tape (I don't have heat shrink gear) to secure the sleave. I don't fully understand how that option will avoid me melting the insulation unless I've totally misunderstood. Sorry :doh:

I'm ording these spades anyway, then at least I tried. I can visualise myself soldering the wire in the small section and crimping the sleave in the larger section with ease lol, but as you touched upon that could be problematic, possibly because these spades are smaller than I think.

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Super Wammer
Hi Tony. Thanks for explaining. I don't wish to make what I assume should be a simple job, but I do need to ask questions which might have very obvious answers. Ok so I solder the wires within the narrowest crimpable section but not crimp the larger crimpable section around the sleave but instead use the electrical tape (I don't have heat shrink gear) to secure the sleave. I don't fully understand how that option will avoid me melting the insulation unless I've totally misunderstood. Sorry :doh:

I'm ording these spades anyway, then at least I tried. I can visualise myself soldering the wire in the small section and crimping the sleave in the larger section with ease lol, but as you touched upon that could be problematic, possibly because these spades are smaller than I think.

It doesn't stop you melting the insulation but it does ensure that the joint is well supported. Heat shrink tubing isn't difficult to use - you choose some that has a diameter about twice that of the joint, fit it over the cable before you solder & slide it back out of the way, then solder the joint. Once the joint is cool, slide the tubing over the joint & heat it to shrink the sleeve - a hair dryer will do, or one of those hot air paint stripping guns, or if you are careful, a blowtorch (the little ones sold for kitchen use are great for this). You need to heat it all the way around for best results. Have a practice first though! Heat shrink comes in different colours too & doesn't cost a lot - for example http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/280-Pcs-Heat-Shrink-Car-Electrical-Wire-Tubing-Tube-Sleeving-Wrap-Cable-Kit-/400915303115?hash=item5d586a0acb:m:mZz5vzWJNFO24czk_s8s6iw - so you could colour code the ends which would be a bonus.

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It doesn't stop you melting the insulation but it does ensure that the joint is well supported. Heat shrink tubing isn't difficult to use - you choose some that has a diameter about twice that of the joint, fit it over the cable before you solder & slide it back out of the way, then solder the joint. Once the joint is cool, slide the tubing over the joint & heat it to shrink the sleeve - a hair dryer will do, or one of those hot air paint stripping guns, or if you are careful, a blowtorch (the little ones sold for kitchen use are great for this). You need to heat it all the way around for best results. Have a practice first though! Heat shrink comes in different colours too & doesn't cost a lot - for example http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/280-Pcs-Heat-Shrink-Car-Electrical-Wire-Tubing-Tube-Sleeving-Wrap-Cable-Kit-/400915303115?hash=item5d586a0acb:m:mZz5vzWJNFO24czk_s8s6iw - so you could colour code the ends which would be a bonus.

Thanks for that advise. The spades have arrived so i now await the crimper. I have to say that these spades look and feel quite substantial, so hope this cheap crimper I posted a link to is up to the job.

So if I understand all the advice so far, I need to do as follows:

Solder the bare wire within the smaller crimpable section then possibly crimp that / Then crimp the larger crimpable section around the sleave. Then if crimping the larger crimpable section doesnt secure the wire I then need to: Place heat shrink tubing around the joint and heat that up with (in my case) a hairdryer or lighter. The cable and crimped section of the spade will be vastly different sizes to each other, but I assume the Heat Shrink will mold around them ok. Also just to confirm the crimping technique: As was earlier mentioned, I need to place one of the notches in the crimper between the open sections of the spade and just squeeze, which I assume will result in an M kind of shape?

Imagine If I wanted to build an amp!

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Super Wammer

Sounds good to me but crimp first before you solder as you could break the solder joint. :^

If you get some heat shrink, you can cut a small section and slide it over the cable before soldering. Then slide the heatshrink up so it's over the begging of the spade and heat with a lighter or hairdryer. I wouldn't worry too much about the insulation around the cable when you solder. If it gets hot or even melts a little bit it will go hard again once cooled.

If you really want a long lasting job... you could put some nail varnish over the solder joint once you're done. This stops the air getting to it and stops it oxidising.

Good luck!

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Sounds good to me but crimp first before you solder as you could break the solder joint. :^

If you get some heat shrink, you can cut a small section and slide it over the cable before soldering. Then slide the heatshrink up so it's over the begging of the spade and heat with a lighter or hairdryer. I wouldn't worry too much about the insulation around the cable when you solder. If it gets hot or even melts a little bit it will go hard again once cooled.

If you really want a long lasting job... you could put some nail varnish over the solder joint once you're done. This stops the air getting to it and stops it oxidising.

Good luck!

Nail varnish, ok noted TY :)

I haven't actually ordered any heat shrink yet. Looking at how much larger the diameter of the beginning of the spade is compared to the wire, I am struggling to see how the heat shrink is going to shrink enough to coat both the wire and the spade. Not to mention that the spade will be even wider once it's crimped. So god knows what shrink size I should buy. Is it unfeasible to forget the heat shrink, not just because of the size concern, but also because ill be covering up a large section of a rather atractive looking connector? :)

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The crimp pliers don't crush like a vice. They apply pressure to a small point that *should* actually make it smaller. Heat shrink shrinks a long way, as long as it's not more than twice the diameter of the cable.:^

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Smaller scale but same principle

[video=youtube;G7TllS7fzB0]

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Ok cheers guys, looks nice and simple then. The crimpers I have on order look nothing like the one in the video https://goo.gl/6JZszK , so it's hard to visualise a similar result. I assume it's the notch numbered 6 that I use. I've ordered some 5mm shrink as the cable is 2.7mm, and hopefully that will squeeze over the spade.

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Rear of Amp.

You can see here that banana plugs don't fit or work, so I just had my cable connected directly, which was also a pain because the wire was too thick to properly slot in the space behind the plastic dial:

TechAmp03_zpsgxi7tr9o.jpg

You can also see that my new spades wont fit the amp, so will have to be a direct connection:

TechAmp02_zpsdrmgxgeg.jpg

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Super Wammer

Have you tried something like https://www.audiovisualonline.co.uk/product/5603/fisual-easy-fix-speaker-pins-4-pack/ they are narrower than bananas

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